Hot Tickets Charter Humanist RSVP Open Captions Sign Language Interpretation
Photo Credit: Matt AlbianiFri, Apr 28 | 5:30 – 6:30 PMHarris Theater205 E Randolph St | Chicago, IL | 60601Members: $34Public: $38Students and Teachers: $25“Sheryl writes about her own heartbreaking experience with a rare honesty…a powerful, practical guide for anyone trying to build resilience in their own lives, communities and companies.” – Bill and Melinda Gates, co-chairs of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Join Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant, authors of Option B, as they talk about building resilience and moving forward after life’s inevitable setbacks. After the sudden death of her husband, Sheryl felt certain that she and her children would never feel pure joy again. Her friend Adam, a psychologist at Wharton, told her there are steps people can take to recover and even rebound. Option B combines Sandberg’s emotional insights and Grant’s eye-opening research on finding strength in the face of adversity. The authors will share what they’ve learned on helping others in crisis, developing compassion for ourselves, raising strong children, and creating resilient families, communities and workplaces. Many of these lessons can be applied to ordinary struggles, allowing us to build resilience for whatever lies ahead. They will discuss the capacity of the human spirit to persevere…and to rediscover joy. Ariel Investments President Mellody Hobson joins Sandberg and Grant in conversation.   This event will feature live open captions to increase access to program content.        This program is generously underwritten by the Make It Better Foundation.    Theater and rental space have been underwritten through the support of Harris Theater for Music and Dance.Ticket purchase includes a signed copy of Option B. An option for 1 book + 2 tickets is available through the box office at (312) 494-9509.Presenters:    Sheryl Sandberg is chief operating officer at Facebook and international best-selling author of Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead. Prior to Facebook, she was vice president of Global Online Sales and Operations at Google. She previously served as chief of staff for the United States Treasury Department and as an economist with the World Bank. She received her BA from Harvard College and an MBA from Harvard Business School. Sandberg is the founder of LeanIn.org and serves on the boards of Facebook, the Walt Disney Company, Women for Women International, ONE, and SurveyMonkey.    Adam Grant is a psychologist and Wharton’s top-rated professor. The New York Times best-selling author of Originals and Give and Take, he is a leading expert on how we can find motivation and meaning and live more generous and creative lives. Grant has been recognized as one of the world’s twenty-five most influential management thinkers and received awards from the American Psychological Association and the National Science Foundation. He also serves as a contributing op-ed writer on work and psychology for The New York Times. Grant earned his BA from Harvard College and his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.        Mellody Hobson is president of Ariel Investments, one of the largest African-American-owned money management firms in the United States. Hobson is a nationally recognized voice on financial literacy and investor education. She is a regular contributor and analyst on finance, the markets and economic trends for CBS News, contributes weekly money tips on the Tom Joyner Morning Show and writes for Black Enterprise magazine. She is a spokesperson for the Ariel/Hewitt study, 401(k) Plans in Living Color and the Ariel Black Investor Survey, both of which examine investing patterns among minorities.
100 | Sheryl Sandberg & Adam Grant: Option B

Photo Credit: Matt Albiani

Fri, Apr 28 | 5:30 – 6:30 PM
Harris Theater
205 E Randolph St | Chicago, IL | 60601
  • Members: $34
  • Public: $38
  • Students and Teachers: $25

“Sheryl writes about her own heartbreaking experience with a rare honesty…a powerful, practical guide for anyone trying to build resilience in their own lives, communities and companies.” – Bill and Melinda Gates, co-chairs of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Join Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant, authors of Option B, as they talk about building resilience and moving forward after life’s inevitable setbacks. After the sudden death of her husband, Sheryl felt certain that she and her children would never feel pure joy again. Her friend Adam, a psychologist at Wharton, told her there are steps people can take to recover and even rebound. Option B combines Sandberg’s emotional insights and Grant’s eye-opening research on finding strength in the face of adversity.

The authors will share what they’ve learned on helping others in crisis, developing compassion for ourselves, raising strong children, and creating resilient families, communities and workplaces. Many of these lessons can be applied to ordinary struggles, allowing us to build resilience for whatever lies ahead. They will discuss the capacity of the human spirit to persevere…and to rediscover joy. Ariel Investments President Mellody Hobson joins Sandberg and Grant in conversation.

This event will feature live open captions to increase access to program content.

This program is generously underwritten by the Make It Better Foundation.

Theater and rental space have been underwritten through the support of Harris Theater for Music and Dance.

Ticket purchase includes a signed copy of Option B. An option for 1 book + 2 tickets is available through the box office at (312) 494-9509.

Presenters:

Sheryl Sandberg is chief operating officer at Facebook and international best-selling author of Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead. Prior to Facebook, she was vice president of Global Online Sales and Operations at Google. She previously served as chief of staff for the United States Treasury Department and as an economist with the World Bank. She received her BA from Harvard College and an MBA from Harvard Business School. Sandberg is the founder of LeanIn.org and serves on the boards of Facebook, the Walt Disney Company, Women for Women International, ONE, and SurveyMonkey.

Adam Grant is a psychologist and Wharton’s top-rated professor. The New York Times best-selling author of Originals and Give and Take, he is a leading expert on how we can find motivation and meaning and live more generous and creative lives. Grant has been recognized as one of the world’s twenty-five most influential management thinkers and received awards from the American Psychological Association and the National Science Foundation. He also serves as a contributing op-ed writer on work and psychology for The New York Times. Grant earned his BA from Harvard College and his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

Mellody Hobson is president of Ariel Investments, one of the largest African-American-owned money management firms in the United States. Hobson is a nationally recognized voice on financial literacy and investor education. She is a regular contributor and analyst on finance, the markets and economic trends for CBS News, contributes weekly money tips on the Tom Joyner Morning Show and writes for Black Enterprise magazine. She is a spokesperson for the Ariel/Hewitt study, 401(k) Plans in Living Color and the Ariel Black Investor Survey, both of which examine investing patterns among minorities.

4/28/2017 5:30 PM
Photo Credit: Ichigo NatsunoFri, Apr 28 | 7:30 – 8:30 PMHarris Theater205 E Randolph St | Chicago, IL | 60601Members: $15Public: $20Students and Teachers: $10Japanese organizing consultant and founder of KonMari Media, Marie Kondo has revolutionized homes—and lives—across the world. Her best-selling books The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up and Spark Joy promise that once you’ve properly decluttered your home, you’ll never have to do it again. Kondo comes to CHF to explain her acclaimed KonMari Method, a category-by-category approach that’s as much about  being mindful, introspective, and optimistic as about organizing your things. Come for a talk from the person the New York Times called “perhaps the world’s only decluttering celebrity.”This event will feature live open captions to increase access to program content.         Preorder your copy of Spark Joy through the CHF box office and save 20%. A book signing will follow this program.        This program is generously underwritten by the Make It Better Foundation.    Theater and rental space have been underwritten through the support of Harris Theater for Music and Dance.    A Talkback hosted by the Make it Better Foundation will follow this program in the Donor Room, second floor.Presenters:    Marie Kondo is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Spark Joy and The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up (also a bestselller in Japan, Germany, and the UK) and was named one of Time magazine's 100 Most Influential People of 2015. She is the Founder and Chief Visionary Officer of KonMari Media Inc.
101 | An Evening with Marie Kondo

Photo Credit: Ichigo Natsuno

Fri, Apr 28 | 7:30 – 8:30 PM
Harris Theater
205 E Randolph St | Chicago, IL | 60601
  • Members: $15
  • Public: $20
  • Students and Teachers: $10

Japanese organizing consultant and founder of KonMari Media, Marie Kondo has revolutionized homes—and lives—across the world. Her best-selling books The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up and Spark Joy promise that once you’ve properly decluttered your home, you’ll never have to do it again. Kondo comes to CHF to explain her acclaimed KonMari Method, a category-by-category approach that’s as much about being mindful, introspective, and optimistic as about organizing your things. Come for a talk from the person the New York Times called “perhaps the world’s only decluttering celebrity.”

This event will feature live open captions to increase access to program content.

Preorder your copy of Spark Joy through the CHF box office and save 20%.

A book signing will follow this program.

This program is generously underwritten by the Make It Better Foundation.

Theater and rental space have been underwritten through the support of Harris Theater for Music and Dance.

A Talkback hosted by the Make it Better Foundation will follow this program in the Donor Room, second floor.

Presenters:

Marie Kondo is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Spark Joy and The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up (also a bestselller in Japan, Germany, and the UK) and was named one of Time magazine's 100 Most Influential People of 2015. She is the Founder and Chief Visionary Officer of KonMari Media Inc.

4/28/2017 7:30 PM
Sat, Apr 29 | 10 – 11 AMFirst United Methodist Church at the Chicago Temple77 W Washington St | Chicago, IL | 60602Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10“Stone shows that with respect to sex and freedom...we are in the midst of a genuine revolution.” – Cass Sunstein, author of #Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social MediaIn his new book Sex and the Constitution, legal scholar and CHF favorite Geoffrey Stone explores the historical evolutions of religious, social, and legal approaches to sex and the surprising role American constitutional law has played in contemporary debates over all manner of sexual mores: obscenity, contraception, abortion, and homosexuality. These issues have been at the core of what Stone deems a “constitutional revolution,” and will likely remain controversial topics under the new administration and the current—and future—line-up on the Supreme Court. Don’t miss this wide-ranging conversation on the past, present, and future of sex, the role of the Court, and the evolution of constitutional law.Preorder your copy of Sex and the Constitution through the CHF box office and save 20%. A book signing will follow this program        This program is presented as part of the Karla Scherer Endowed Lecture Series for the University of Chicago.Presenters:    Geoffrey R. Stone is Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago. He has served as Dean of the Law School (1987-1994) and as Provost of the University of Chicago (1994-2002). Stone is one of the nation's leading scholars on constitutional law.
200 | Geoffrey Stone: Sex, the Constitution, and the Supreme Court
Sat, Apr 29 | 10 – 11 AM
First United Methodist Church at the Chicago Temple
77 W Washington St | Chicago, IL | 60602
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

“Stone shows that with respect to sex and freedom...we are in the midst of a genuine revolution.” – Cass Sunstein, author of #Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media

In his new book Sex and the Constitution, legal scholar and CHF favorite Geoffrey Stone explores the historical evolutions of religious, social, and legal approaches to sex and the surprising role American constitutional law has played in contemporary debates over all manner of sexual mores: obscenity, contraception, abortion, and homosexuality. These issues have been at the core of what Stone deems a “constitutional revolution,” and will likely remain controversial topics under the new administration and the current—and future—line-up on the Supreme Court. Don’t miss this wide-ranging conversation on the past, present, and future of sex, the role of the Court, and the evolution of constitutional law.

Preorder your copy of Sex and the Constitution through the CHF box office and save 20%.

A book signing will follow this program

This program is presented as part of the Karla Scherer Endowed Lecture Series for the University of Chicago.

Presenters:

Geoffrey R. Stone is Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago. He has served as Dean of the Law School (1987-1994) and as Provost of the University of Chicago (1994-2002). Stone is one of the nation's leading scholars on constitutional law.

4/29/2017 10:00 AM
Warhol’s Hoard in Sotheby’s Warehouse, 1988. Photo Credit: Frederick CharlesSat, Apr 29 | 10 – 11 AMVenue SIX10Feinberg Theater610 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10Americans buy and throw away a lot of stuff, but most of all, we keep a lot of stuff. We watch TV shows about people whose homes are stuffed with towering piles of garbage and shows about storage units filled with forgotten things. In 2013, hoarding received an official designation as a specific form of mental illness in DSM-V. Scott Herring, the author of The Hoarders, disagrees, arguing that hoarding is a mode of expression—sometimes artful, often desperate—befitting our world of material excess. CHF Marilynn Thoma Artistic Director Jonathan Elmer joins Herring in conversationPreorder your copy of The Hoarders through the CHF box office and save 20%.A book signing will follow this program.    This program is presented in partnership with the College of Arts and Humanities Institute, Indiana University.Presenters:    Scott Herring is James H. Rudy Professor of English at Indiana University. He is the author of several books including, most recently, The Hoarders: Material Deviance in Modern American Culture (University of Chicago Press, 2014).        Jonathan Elmer is the Marilynn Thoma Artistic Director at CHF. He is also a professor of English at Indiana University, and directs the College Arts and Humanities Institute, the public face for the arts and humanities on campus. He earned a BA from Yale University and a PhD from University of California, Berkeley. He has published widely on American culture and literature, is a leading expert on the writings of Edgar Allan Poe, and currently researches how the notion of “play” fundamentally transformed the art, culture, and business of the 20th century.
201 | Hoarders

Warhol’s Hoard in Sotheby’s Warehouse, 1988. Photo Credit: Frederick Charles

Sat, Apr 29 | 10 – 11 AM
Venue SIX10
Feinberg Theater
610 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

Americans buy and throw away a lot of stuff, but most of all, we keep a lot of stuff. We watch TV shows about people whose homes are stuffed with towering piles of garbage and shows about storage units filled with forgotten things. In 2013, hoarding received an official designation as a specific form of mental illness in DSM-V. Scott Herring, the author of The Hoarders, disagrees, arguing that hoarding is a mode of expression—sometimes artful, often desperate—befitting our world of material excess. CHF Marilynn Thoma Artistic Director Jonathan Elmer joins Herring in conversation

Preorder your copy of The Hoarders through the CHF box office and save 20%.

A book signing will follow this program.

This program is presented in partnership with the College of Arts and Humanities Institute, Indiana University.

Presenters:

Scott Herring is James H. Rudy Professor of English at Indiana University. He is the author of several books including, most recently, The Hoarders: Material Deviance in Modern American Culture (University of Chicago Press, 2014).

Jonathan Elmer is the Marilynn Thoma Artistic Director at CHF. He is also a professor of English at Indiana University, and directs the College Arts and Humanities Institute, the public face for the arts and humanities on campus. He earned a BA from Yale University and a PhD from University of California, Berkeley. He has published widely on American culture and literature, is a leading expert on the writings of Edgar Allan Poe, and currently researches how the notion of “play” fundamentally transformed the art, culture, and business of the 20th century.

4/29/2017 10:00 AM
Wailing Wall. Photo Courtesy of the artist.Sat, Apr 29 | 12 – 1 PMArt Institute of ChicagoFullerton Hall111 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60603Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10Cecil McDonald, Jr. is trying to right what he sees as a representational wrong: depictions of black people as either victims or heroes. His award-winning photographs focus on capturing the “extraordinarily ordinary” contours of black life. His debut monograph In the Company of Black, depicts artists, business owners, and teachers conducting their lives in the spaces they have created for themselves. McDonald is joined by famed photographer Dawoud Bey for a probing presentation of the way photography can diminish or enhance our experience of others.A book signing will follow this program.        The annual Richard Gray Visual Art Series recognizes a significant gift from founding CHF board member and distinguished art dealer Richard Gray. This program is presented in partnership with the Art Institute of Chicago.Presenters:    Cecil McDonald Jr. uses photography, video, and text to explore masculinity, familial relations, and the artistic pursuits of Black culture. McDonald received his MFA in Photography at Columbia College Chicago, where he is an adjunct professor. He has works in the permanent collection of The Cleveland Museum of Art, Chicago Bank of America LaSalle Collection, and the Harris Bank Collection. He’s received the Joyce Foundation Midwest Voices & Visions Award, the Artadia Award, and the 3Arts Teaching Artist Award. In the Company of Black, his debut monograph, is due for spring 2017.        Dawoud Bey began his photography career in 1975 in Harlem, New York. His debut exhibition, "Harlem, USA" opened at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 1979. His photographs have been displayed in the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Bibliothèque nationale de France in Paris and the Whitney Museum of American Art. A twenty-year survey of his photographs was organized by the Walker Art Center in 1995, which toured museums throughout the United States and Great Britain through 1998. He is represented by galleries in Chicago, New York, and Stockholm, Sweden.
202 | Photographing Black Life

Wailing Wall. Photo Courtesy of the artist.

Sat, Apr 29 | 12 – 1 PM
Art Institute of Chicago
Fullerton Hall
111 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60603
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

Cecil McDonald, Jr. is trying to right what he sees as a representational wrong: depictions of black people as either victims or heroes. His award-winning photographs focus on capturing the “extraordinarily ordinary” contours of black life. His debut monograph In the Company of Black, depicts artists, business owners, and teachers conducting their lives in the spaces they have created for themselves. McDonald is joined by famed photographer Dawoud Bey for a probing presentation of the way photography can diminish or enhance our experience of others.

A book signing will follow this program.

The annual Richard Gray Visual Art Series recognizes a significant gift from founding CHF board member and distinguished art dealer Richard Gray. This program is presented in partnership with the Art Institute of Chicago.

Presenters:

Cecil McDonald Jr. uses photography, video, and text to explore masculinity, familial relations, and the artistic pursuits of Black culture. McDonald received his MFA in Photography at Columbia College Chicago, where he is an adjunct professor. He has works in the permanent collection of The Cleveland Museum of Art, Chicago Bank of America LaSalle Collection, and the Harris Bank Collection. He’s received the Joyce Foundation Midwest Voices & Visions Award, the Artadia Award, and the 3Arts Teaching Artist Award. In the Company of Black, his debut monograph, is due for spring 2017.

Dawoud Bey began his photography career in 1975 in Harlem, New York. His debut exhibition, "Harlem, USA" opened at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 1979. His photographs have been displayed in the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Bibliothèque nationale de France in Paris and the Whitney Museum of American Art. A twenty-year survey of his photographs was organized by the Walker Art Center in 1995, which toured museums throughout the United States and Great Britain through 1998. He is represented by galleries in Chicago, New York, and Stockholm, Sweden.

4/29/2017 12:00 PM
Sat, Apr 29 | 12 – 1 PMFirst United Methodist Church at the Chicago Temple77 W Washington St | Chicago, IL | 60602Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10Last year, blue state and red state voters alike found common ground in their shared concerns about growing income inequality. The gap between rich and poor has long been the terrain of Sarah Smarsh, who has written extensively and eloquently about the working poor and her own upbringing in rural Kansas. She has recently contributed to a new anthology, Tales of Two Americas: Stories of Inequality in a Divided State, edited by John Freeman. Join Smarsh and Freeman for a reading and conversation about poverty in America.Presenters:    Sarah Smarsh is a journalist who writes about socioeconomic class in America. She has reported on public policy for Harper's, NewYorker.com, The Guardian, Guernica, and others. Her essays on cultural boundaries have been published in Aeon, McSweeney’s, On Being, The Texas Observer, and more. Smarsh’s book on the working poor and her upbringing in rural Kansas, In the Red, is forthcoming from Scribner. She lives in Kansas and Texas.        John Freeman is the founder of the literary biannual Freeman's and executive editor of Lit Hub, the daily website for books. The former editor of Granta, he assembled the anthologies Tales of Two Cities and Tales of Two Americas, and is the author of The Tyranny of Email and How to Read a Novelist, and Maps, a forthcoming collection of poetry. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and has been translated into twenty languages. He lives in New York City and is Writer in Residence at NYU.
203 | Rich Man, Poor Man: Tales of Two Americas
Sat, Apr 29 | 12 – 1 PM
First United Methodist Church at the Chicago Temple
77 W Washington St | Chicago, IL | 60602
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

Last year, blue state and red state voters alike found common ground in their shared concerns about growing income inequality. The gap between rich and poor has long been the terrain of Sarah Smarsh, who has written extensively and eloquently about the working poor and her own upbringing in rural Kansas. She has recently contributed to a new anthology, Tales of Two Americas: Stories of Inequality in a Divided State, edited by John Freeman. Join Smarsh and Freeman for a reading and conversation about poverty in America.

Presenters:

Sarah Smarsh is a journalist who writes about socioeconomic class in America. She has reported on public policy for Harper's, NewYorker.com, The Guardian, Guernica, and others. Her essays on cultural boundaries have been published in Aeon, McSweeney’s, On Being, The Texas Observer, and more. Smarsh’s book on the working poor and her upbringing in rural Kansas, In the Red, is forthcoming from Scribner. She lives in Kansas and Texas.

John Freeman is the founder of the literary biannual Freeman's and executive editor of Lit Hub, the daily website for books. The former editor of Granta, he assembled the anthologies Tales of Two Cities and Tales of Two Americas, and is the author of The Tyranny of Email and How to Read a Novelist, and Maps, a forthcoming collection of poetry. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and has been translated into twenty languages. He lives in New York City and is Writer in Residence at NYU.

4/29/2017 12:00 PM
Sat, Apr 29 | 12 – 1 PMVenue SIX10Feinberg Theater610 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10Carl Zimring wrote the book on garbage. Well, several actually. He has written about environmental racism and scrap recycling and edited the two-volume Encyclopedia of Consumption and Waste: The Social Science of Garbage. His most recent work is Aluminum Upcycled, which explores how discarded materials are fashioned into goods of greater value, focusing on aluminum and its crucial role in post-WWII design. With an eye to how attitudes about waste shape culture, institutions, and inequalities, Zimring will offer a uniquely well-informed perspective on the past, present, and future of garbage.Preorder your copy of Aluminum Upcycled through the CHF box office and save 20%. A book signing will follow this program.        Presenters:    Carl A. Zimring is an environmental historian interested in how attitudes concerning waste shape society, culture, institutions, and inequalities. He coordinates the Pratt Institute’s Sustainability Studies program and his books include Cash for Your Trash: Scrap Recycling in America (2005), The Encyclopedia of Consumption and Waste (2012), Clean and White: A History of Environmental Racism in the United States (2015), and the new Aluminum Upcycled: Sustainable Design in Historical Perspective (2017).
204 | What We're Throwing Away
Sat, Apr 29 | 12 – 1 PM
Venue SIX10
Feinberg Theater
610 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

Carl Zimring wrote the book on garbage. Well, several actually. He has written about environmental racism and scrap recycling and edited the two-volume Encyclopedia of Consumption and Waste: The Social Science of Garbage. His most recent work is Aluminum Upcycled, which explores how discarded materials are fashioned into goods of greater value, focusing on aluminum and its crucial role in post-WWII design. With an eye to how attitudes about waste shape culture, institutions, and inequalities, Zimring will offer a uniquely well-informed perspective on the past, present, and future of garbage.

Preorder your copy of Aluminum Upcycled through the CHF box office and save 20%.

A book signing will follow this program.

Presenters:

Carl A. Zimring is an environmental historian interested in how attitudes concerning waste shape society, culture, institutions, and inequalities. He coordinates the Pratt Institute’s Sustainability Studies program and his books include Cash for Your Trash: Scrap Recycling in America (2005), The Encyclopedia of Consumption and Waste (2012), Clean and White: A History of Environmental Racism in the United States (2015), and the new Aluminum Upcycled: Sustainable Design in Historical Perspective (2017).

4/29/2017 12:00 PM
Photo Credit: Mia FermindozaSat, Apr 29 | 2 – 3 PMArt Institute of ChicagoFullerton Hall111 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60603Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10Kimberly Drew, social media manager for The Metropolitan Museum of Art, engages millions of Met fans through social media platforms across the internet. Drew will talk about how a 146-year-old institution stays relevant in a digital world, with insights from her popular Tumblr blog Black Contemporary Art, a place for art about and for people of African descent. EBONY Editor-in-Chief and Senior Vice President and Head of Digital Editorial Kyra Kyles joins this conversation.This event will feature live open captions to increase access to program content.         This program is presented in partnership with the Art Institute of Chicago.Join the Shortlist after this program for the chance to connect with our community of culturally curious Chicagoans in their 20s and 30s. Click here for more info.    Presenters:    Kimberly Drew received her B.A. from Smith College in Art History and African-American Studies, with a concentration in Museum Studies. An avid lover of black culture and art, Drew first experienced the art world as an intern in the Director’s Office of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Her time at the Studio Museum inspired her to start the Tumblr blog Black Contemporary Art, sparking her interest in social media. Drew is currently the Social Media Manager at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. You can follow her on Twitter and Instagram at @museummammy.        Kyra Kyles is the EBONY Editor-in-Chief and Senior Vice President and Head of Digital Editorial. This award-winning multimedia journalist, TV personality, content producer and humor writer originally joined the iconic brand in 2011.  Among her accolades, she has been named to the Folio magazine Top 100 media executives, WVON and Ariel Capital’s “Top 40 Under 40 Game Changers” and Chicago Defender’s “40 Under 40 to Watch” lists. Kyra is a proud alum of Northwestern University Medill School of Journalism.
205 | Kimberly Drew: Curating Art in a Digital World

Photo Credit: Mia Fermindoza

Sat, Apr 29 | 2 – 3 PM
Art Institute of Chicago
Fullerton Hall
111 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60603
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

Kimberly Drew, social media manager for The Metropolitan Museum of Art, engages millions of Met fans through social media platforms across the internet. Drew will talk about how a 146-year-old institution stays relevant in a digital world, with insights from her popular Tumblr blog Black Contemporary Art, a place for art about and for people of African descent. EBONY Editor-in-Chief and Senior Vice President and Head of Digital Editorial Kyra Kyles joins this conversation.

This event will feature live open captions to increase access to program content.

This program is presented in partnership with the Art Institute of Chicago.

Join the Shortlist after this program for the chance to connect with our community of culturally curious Chicagoans in their 20s and 30s. Click here for more info.

Presenters:

Kimberly Drew received her B.A. from Smith College in Art History and African-American Studies, with a concentration in Museum Studies. An avid lover of black culture and art, Drew first experienced the art world as an intern in the Director’s Office of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Her time at the Studio Museum inspired her to start the Tumblr blog Black Contemporary Art, sparking her interest in social media. Drew is currently the Social Media Manager at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. You can follow her on Twitter and Instagram at @museummammy.

Kyra Kyles is the EBONY Editor-in-Chief and Senior Vice President and Head of Digital Editorial. This award-winning multimedia journalist, TV personality, content producer and humor writer originally joined the iconic brand in 2011. Among her accolades, she has been named to the Folio magazine Top 100 media executives, WVON and Ariel Capital’s “Top 40 Under 40 Game Changers” and Chicago Defender’s “40 Under 40 to Watch” lists. Kyra is a proud alum of Northwestern University Medill School of Journalism.

4/29/2017 2:00 PM
Sat, Apr 29 | 2 –3 PMFirst United Methodist Church at the Chicago Temple77 W Washington St | Chicago, IL | 60602Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10How do we share the stuff that nobody owns but everyone needs? Water is one of our most precious and finite resources, but it’s also under threat from climate change, overzealous development, and inconsistent governance. Join Kim Wasserman-Nieto, executive director of the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization, and Michael Tiboris, from the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, for a conversation about local and national approaches to water security and sustainability.       This program is generously underwritten by the Make It Better Foundation.A Talkback hosted by the Metropolitan Planning Council will follow this program in the James Parlor, Second Floor.        Presenters:        Kimberly Wasserman-Nieto is Executive Director of the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization (LVEJO), where she has worked since 1998, working with organizers to reinstate a job access bus line, building on the recent victory of a new 23 acre park to be built in Little Village, and continuing the 10 plus year campaign for the remediation and redevelopment of closed local coal power plants. Wasserman is a member of the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council and Chair of the Illinois EJ Commission. She received the 2013 Goldman Prize for North America.        Michael Tiboris is a Global Water Fellow at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs and Public Fellow for the American Council of Learned Societies. He specializes in ethical issues in water access and the role of water in foreign policy.  His work has appeared in both academic journals and popular media, including Social Theory and Practice, The Georgetown Journal of International Affairs, The National Interest, and Foreign Policy.
206 | Keeping Our Water Safe
Sat, Apr 29 | 2 –3 PM
First United Methodist Church at the Chicago Temple
77 W Washington St | Chicago, IL | 60602
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

How do we share the stuff that nobody owns but everyone needs? Water is one of our most precious and finite resources, but it’s also under threat from climate change, overzealous development, and inconsistent governance. Join Kim Wasserman-Nieto, executive director of the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization, and Michael Tiboris, from the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, for a conversation about local and national approaches to water security and sustainability.

This program is generously underwritten by the Make It Better Foundation.

A Talkback hosted by the Metropolitan Planning Council will follow this program in the James Parlor, Second Floor.

Presenters:

Kimberly Wasserman-Nieto is Executive Director of the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization (LVEJO), where she has worked since 1998, working with organizers to reinstate a job access bus line, building on the recent victory of a new 23 acre park to be built in Little Village, and continuing the 10 plus year campaign for the remediation and redevelopment of closed local coal power plants. Wasserman is a member of the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council and Chair of the Illinois EJ Commission. She received the 2013 Goldman Prize for North America.

Michael Tiboris is a Global Water Fellow at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs and Public Fellow for the American Council of Learned Societies. He specializes in ethical issues in water access and the role of water in foreign policy. His work has appeared in both academic journals and popular media, including Social Theory and Practice, The Georgetown Journal of International Affairs, The National Interest, and Foreign Policy.

4/29/2017 2:00 PM
Photo Credit: Charlie Round-TurnerSat, Apr 29 | 2 – 3 PMFine Arts BuildingStudebaker Theater410 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10“Dr. Cheng…is winning fame as a math popularizer, convinced that the pleasures of math can be conveyed to the legions of numbers-averse.” – Natalie Angier, The New York Times Renaissance woman Eugenia Cheng has a knack for making complex math accessible. Her latest thinking and book, Beyond Infinity, takes on the mind-bending qualities of both the unimaginably large and the infinitesimally small. The scientist in residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an accomplished classical pianist, Cheng has also explored the beauty of mathematics, using unexpected insights from her kitchen (How to Bake Pi).  Golden Apple award-winner Luke Albrecht joins Cheng on-stage for an entertaining and enlightening discourse on questions like why 1 + infinity is not the same as infinity + 1.Preorder your copy of Beyond Infinity through the CHF box office and save 20%. A book signing will follow this program.        This program and student matinee are generously underwritten by Baxter International Inc.Presenters:    Eugenia Cheng is a Scientist in Residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an Honorary Fellow of the University of Sheffield. The author of How to Bake Pi, she lives in Chicago, Illinois.    Luke Albrecht has taught middle grade mathematics in CPS for the last 15 years. He currently teaches at Ray Elementary in Hyde Park. In 2014 he won the Golden Apple Award for Excellence in Teaching. He is passionate about integrating the arts and fostering student creativity in his classroom. He has partnered with many Chicago arts organizations, including The Art Institute, CCAP’s Project AIM, and Zephyr Dance.
207 | Eugenia Cheng: To Infinity - and Beyond

Photo Credit: Charlie Round-Turner

Sat, Apr 29 | 2 – 3 PM
Fine Arts Building
Studebaker Theater
410 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

“Dr. Cheng…is winning fame as a math popularizer, convinced that the pleasures of math can be conveyed to the legions of numbers-averse.” – Natalie Angier, The New York Times

Renaissance woman Eugenia Cheng has a knack for making complex math accessible. Her latest thinking and book, Beyond Infinity, takes on the mind-bending qualities of both the unimaginably large and the infinitesimally small. The scientist in residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an accomplished classical pianist, Cheng has also explored the beauty of mathematics, using unexpected insights from her kitchen (How to Bake Pi). Golden Apple award-winner Luke Albrecht joins Cheng on-stage for an entertaining and enlightening discourse on questions like why 1 + infinity is not the same as infinity + 1.

Preorder your copy of Beyond Infinity through the CHF box office and save 20%.

A book signing will follow this program.

This program and student matinee are generously underwritten by Baxter International Inc.

Presenters:

Eugenia Cheng is a Scientist in Residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an Honorary Fellow of the University of Sheffield. The author of How to Bake Pi, she lives in Chicago, Illinois.




Luke Albrecht has taught middle grade mathematics in CPS for the last 15 years. He currently teaches at Ray Elementary in Hyde Park. In 2014 he won the Golden Apple Award for Excellence in Teaching. He is passionate about integrating the arts and fostering student creativity in his classroom. He has partnered with many Chicago arts organizations, including The Art Institute, CCAP’s Project AIM, and Zephyr Dance.

4/29/2017 2:00 PM
Photo courtesy of the artists.Sat, Apr 29 | 2 – 3 PMVenue SIX10Feinberg Theater610 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10More than twenty years ago, photographer Peter Menzel created a team to take pictures all around the globe of statistically average families and all they owned, posed outside their homes. The book, Material World, is a fascinating window into the very idea of “worldly possessions.” Since then, Menzel and his partner Faith D’Aluisio have created several other award-winning books: Women in the Material World, Hungry Planet: What the World Eats, and What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets. Come hear from D'Aluisio and experience the unique photographic tour they have created from their work and hear what they have learned about our common humanity.Preorder your copy of Material World through the CHF box office and save 20%. A book signing will follow this program.    Presenters:    Faith D’Aluisio is a former award-winning television news producer. She is the editor and lead writer for the book-publishing imprint Material World Books.
208 | Material World

Photo courtesy of the artists.

Sat, Apr 29 | 2 – 3 PM
Venue SIX10
Feinberg Theater
610 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

More than twenty years ago, photographer Peter Menzel created a team to take pictures all around the globe of statistically average families and all they owned, posed outside their homes. The book, Material World, is a fascinating window into the very idea of “worldly possessions.” Since then, Menzel and his partner Faith D’Aluisio have created several other award-winning books: Women in the Material World, Hungry Planet: What the World Eats, and What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets. Come hear from D'Aluisio and experience the unique photographic tour they have created from their work and hear what they have learned about our common humanity.

Preorder your copy of Material World through the CHF box office and save 20%.

A book signing will follow this program.

Presenters:

Faith D’Aluisio is a former award-winning television news producer. She is the editor and lead writer for the book-publishing imprint Material World Books.

4/29/2017 2:00 PM
Photo Credit: Ben GonzalezSat, Apr 29 | 3 – 4 PMChicago Athletic AssociationThe North Fireplace at the Drawing Room12 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60603FREELight Snacks and Cash BarDig deeper and explore the issues you care about with the Shortlist, our culturally curious community of young professionals in their 20s and 30s. Join Shortlist ticket buyers and committee members for drinks, snacks, and conversation after the 2 PM program, Kimberly Drew: Curating Art in a Digital World. Click here for more info on the CHF Shortlist.Though this event is free, space is limited and tickets must be reserved online or through the CHF Box Office, 312-494-9509. Complimentary snacks and a cash bar will be provided.
205E | Shortlist Social

Photo Credit: Ben Gonzalez

Sat, Apr 29 | 3 – 4 PM
Chicago Athletic Association
The North Fireplace at the Drawing Room
12 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60603
  • FREE
  • Light Snacks and Cash Bar

Dig deeper and explore the issues you care about with the Shortlist, our culturally curious community of young professionals in their 20s and 30s. Join Shortlist ticket buyers and committee members for drinks, snacks, and conversation after the 2 PM program, Kimberly Drew: Curating Art in a Digital World. Click here for more info on the CHF Shortlist.

Though this event is free, space is limited and tickets must be reserved online or through the CHF Box Office, 312-494-9509. Complimentary snacks and a cash bar will be provided.

4/29/2017 3:00 PM
Tightrope British Council, Adis Ababa. Courtesy of the artist.Sat, Apr 29 | 4 – 5 PMArt Institute of ChicagoFullerton Hall111 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60603Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10Art is a powerful way to investigate how humans impact the planet. That's the approach of Ethiopian artist Elias Sime, who found himself pondering people’s preoccupation with their cellphones, and the lifecycle of these objects, from treasured devices to e-waste. He shopped the open-air markets in Addis Ababa for electronic detritus, producing monumental works from small parts: circuit boards, screws, wiring, and motherboards, the inner “guts” of computers. The results are both an unexpected view of our out-of-control technological consumption and gorgeous, abstract sculptural landscapes. Join Sime, School of the Art Institute professor Delinda Collier, and translator Meskerem Assegued for a conversation about art and renewal.       The annual Richard Gray Visual Art Series recognizes a significant gift from founding CHF board member and distinguished art dealer Richard Gray. This program is presented in partnership with the Art Institute of Chicago, with translation by Meskerem Assegued.Presenters:    Elias Sime is a multi-disciplinary artist working in relief sculpture, performance art, and architecture. For more than twenty-five years, Sime has made collage and sculptural assemblage from found objects such as thread, buttons, plastic, animal skins, horn, and discarded electronic materials. His work has been in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, the Studio Museum in Harlem, and a survey exhibition that traveled from the Santa Monica Museum of Art, California, to the North Dakota Museum of Art. His work is included in the permanent collection of many museums around the world.    Delinda Collier is Associate Professor of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is the author of Repainting the Walls of Lunda: Information Colonialism and Angolan Art and is currently finishing a book manuscript on the history of new media art in Africa. Her articles have appeared in Nka, Art South Africa, Third Text, African Arts, Critical Interventions, and ISEA Conference Proceedings.        Meskerem Assegued is a curator, anthropologist, and writer. In 2002 she founded Zoma Contemporary Art Center (ZCAC) in Addis Ababa, and since 1998 has curated numerous exhibitions, both in Ethiopia and abroad, including many exhibitions featuring the work of Elias Sime. Meskerem is currently constructing the ZCAC Museum, an ecological vernacular building with Elias Sime in Addis Ababa. In April 2017 she curated Sime’s new show at the James Cohan Gallery in New York.
209 | Art and Obsolescence: Elias Sime

Tightrope British Council, Adis Ababa. Courtesy of the artist.

Sat, Apr 29 | 4 – 5 PM
Art Institute of Chicago
Fullerton Hall
111 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60603
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

Art is a powerful way to investigate how humans impact the planet. That's the approach of Ethiopian artist Elias Sime, who found himself pondering people’s preoccupation with their cellphones, and the lifecycle of these objects, from treasured devices to e-waste. He shopped the open-air markets in Addis Ababa for electronic detritus, producing monumental works from small parts: circuit boards, screws, wiring, and motherboards, the inner “guts” of computers. The results are both an unexpected view of our out-of-control technological consumption and gorgeous, abstract sculptural landscapes. Join Sime, School of the Art Institute professor Delinda Collier, and translator Meskerem Assegued for a conversation about art and renewal.

The annual Richard Gray Visual Art Series recognizes a significant gift from founding CHF board member and distinguished art dealer Richard Gray. This program is presented in partnership with the Art Institute of Chicago, with translation by Meskerem Assegued.

Presenters:

Elias Sime is a multi-disciplinary artist working in relief sculpture, performance art, and architecture. For more than twenty-five years, Sime has made collage and sculptural assemblage from found objects such as thread, buttons, plastic, animal skins, horn, and discarded electronic materials. His work has been in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, the Studio Museum in Harlem, and a survey exhibition that traveled from the Santa Monica Museum of Art, California, to the North Dakota Museum of Art. His work is included in the permanent collection of many museums around the world.

Delinda Collier is Associate Professor of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is the author of Repainting the Walls of Lunda: Information Colonialism and Angolan Art and is currently finishing a book manuscript on the history of new media art in Africa. Her articles have appeared in Nka, Art South Africa, Third Text, African Arts, Critical Interventions, and ISEA Conference Proceedings.

Meskerem Assegued is a curator, anthropologist, and writer. In 2002 she founded Zoma Contemporary Art Center (ZCAC) in Addis Ababa, and since 1998 has curated numerous exhibitions, both in Ethiopia and abroad, including many exhibitions featuring the work of Elias Sime. Meskerem is currently constructing the ZCAC Museum, an ecological vernacular building with Elias Sime in Addis Ababa. In April 2017 she curated Sime’s new show at the James Cohan Gallery in New York.

4/29/2017 4:00 PM
Sat, Apr 29 | 4 – 5 PMFine Arts BuildingStudebaker Theater410 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10“Jennings and Duffy are magnificent and this comic is a glorious tribute to Octavia Butler's masterpiece. Extraordinary.” – Junot Díaz, author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar WaoIn her 1979 masterpiece, Kindred, Octavia E. Butler explored time travel, American slavery, and the social tensions of race and gender—the tough stuff that keeps tying us in knots. Now the mind-bending story has been transformed into a graphic novel, adapted by Damian Duffy and illustrated by John Jennings, expanding this examination of our troubled history into a vibrant format that widens its reach to newer audiences. Come hear Duffy and Jennings along with Chicago artist Krista Franklin for a discussion of the power of Kindred and what it takes to translate a novel into a graphic novel.Preorder your copy of Kindred: A Graphic Novel through the CHF box office and save 20%. A book signing will follow this program.    A Talkback hosted by Free Write will follow this program.        Presenters:    Damian Duffy is a cartoonist, scholar, writer, curator, lecturer, teacher, and Glyph Comics Award-winning graphic novelist. He holds a MS and PhD in Library and Information Sciences from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His many publications include academic essays (in comics form) on new media & learning, art books about underrepresentation in comics culture, editorial comics, and the New York Times best-seller, Kindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation, created with frequent collaborator John Jennings. Damian has given talks and lead workshops about comics, art, and education internationally.        John Jennings is a Professor of Media and Cultural Studies at the University of California, Riverside.  He co-edited the Eisner Award winning collection The Blacker the Ink: Constructions of Black Identity in Comics and Sequential Art and co-founded the Schomburg Center's Black Comic Book Festival in Harlem and the MLK NorCal's Black Comix Arts Festival in San Francisco. Jennings is currently a Nasir Jones Hip-Hop Studies Fellow at Harvard. His current projects include the hip-hop adventure comic Kid Code: Channel Zero, and the supernatural crime noir story Blue Hand Mojo.        Krista Franklin is an interdisciplinary artist who works between the literary and the visual with a focus on popular culture, African diaspora, and the psychic interiority of people of color. She is the recipient of the Propeller Fund, a Cave Canem Fellow, and held an artist-in-residency at University of Chicago’s Arts & Public Life initiative. Her work has been published in several literary and lifestyle journals, and her chapbook Study of Love & Black Body was published by Willow Books in 2012. She holds an MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts from Columbia College Chicago.
210 | Octavia E. Butler's Kindred: A Graphic Novel
Sat, Apr 29 | 4 – 5 PM
Fine Arts Building
Studebaker Theater
410 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

“Jennings and Duffy are magnificent and this comic is a glorious tribute to Octavia Butler's masterpiece. Extraordinary.” – Junot Díaz, author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

In her 1979 masterpiece, Kindred, Octavia E. Butler explored time travel, American slavery, and the social tensions of race and gender—the tough stuff that keeps tying us in knots. Now the mind-bending story has been transformed into a graphic novel, adapted by Damian Duffy and illustrated by John Jennings, expanding this examination of our troubled history into a vibrant format that widens its reach to newer audiences. Come hear Duffy and Jennings along with Chicago artist Krista Franklin for a discussion of the power of Kindred and what it takes to translate a novel into a graphic novel.

Preorder your copy of Kindred: A Graphic Novel through the CHF box office and save 20%.

A book signing will follow this program.

A Talkback hosted by Free Write will follow this program.

Presenters:

Damian Duffy is a cartoonist, scholar, writer, curator, lecturer, teacher, and Glyph Comics Award-winning graphic novelist. He holds a MS and PhD in Library and Information Sciences from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His many publications include academic essays (in comics form) on new media & learning, art books about underrepresentation in comics culture, editorial comics, and the New York Times best-seller, Kindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation, created with frequent collaborator John Jennings. Damian has given talks and lead workshops about comics, art, and education internationally.

John Jennings is a Professor of Media and Cultural Studies at the University of California, Riverside. He co-edited the Eisner Award winning collection The Blacker the Ink: Constructions of Black Identity in Comics and Sequential Art and co-founded the Schomburg Center's Black Comic Book Festival in Harlem and the MLK NorCal's Black Comix Arts Festival in San Francisco. Jennings is currently a Nasir Jones Hip-Hop Studies Fellow at Harvard. His current projects include the hip-hop adventure comic Kid Code: Channel Zero, and the supernatural crime noir story Blue Hand Mojo.

Krista Franklin is an interdisciplinary artist who works between the literary and the visual with a focus on popular culture, African diaspora, and the psychic interiority of people of color. She is the recipient of the Propeller Fund, a Cave Canem Fellow, and held an artist-in-residency at University of Chicago’s Arts & Public Life initiative. Her work has been published in several literary and lifestyle journals, and her chapbook Study of Love & Black Body was published by Willow Books in 2012. She holds an MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts from Columbia College Chicago.

4/29/2017 4:00 PM
    Sat, Apr 29 | 6 – 7 PMFine Arts BuildingStudebaker Theater410 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10 “A cabaret icon” – NBC News ChicagoChicago-based Joan Curto is known for her powerful voice and her thoughtful interpretations of songs, both contemporary and classic. For Springfest/17: Stuff, Curto has fashioned a charming tour through the American Songbook, with special attention to the things, both tangible and intangible, that are part and parcel of some of the most beloved songs of Cole Porter, Irving Berlin, Richard Rodgers, the Gershwins, and more. Curto and her trio will serve up a performance not to be missed.       This program is generously underwritten by the Helen B. and Ira E. Graham Family. Presenters:    Joan Curto showcases music from both the Classic and the New American Songbook. She has developed and performed shows that feature the music of Cole Porter, George and Ira Gershwin, Richard Rodgers and Jerry Herman. She has appeared in the Chicago Humanities Festival, the Mabel Mercer Foundation’s Cabaret Convention, and countless acclaimed cabaret clubs and concerts including New York’s Jazz at Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Room, The Gardenia in Los Angeles, and many others. Recently, Joan developed, directed and appeared in the Cole Porter 125 Birthday Celebration at The Auditorium Theatre.
211 | Just One of Those Things: Joan Curto and the American Songbook
Sat, Apr 29 | 6 – 7 PM
Fine Arts Building
Studebaker Theater
410 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

“A cabaret icon” – NBC News Chicago

Chicago-based Joan Curto is known for her powerful voice and her thoughtful interpretations of songs, both contemporary and classic. For Springfest/17: Stuff, Curto has fashioned a charming tour through the American Songbook, with special attention to the things, both tangible and intangible, that are part and parcel of some of the most beloved songs of Cole Porter, Irving Berlin, Richard Rodgers, the Gershwins, and more. Curto and her trio will serve up a performance not to be missed.

This program is generously underwritten by the Helen B. and Ira E. Graham Family.

Presenters:

Joan Curto showcases music from both the Classic and the New American Songbook. She has developed and performed shows that feature the music of Cole Porter, George and Ira Gershwin, Richard Rodgers and Jerry Herman. She has appeared in the Chicago Humanities Festival, the Mabel Mercer Foundation’s Cabaret Convention, and countless acclaimed cabaret clubs and concerts including New York’s Jazz at Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Room, The Gardenia in Los Angeles, and many others. Recently, Joan developed, directed and appeared in the Cole Porter 125 Birthday Celebration at The Auditorium Theatre.

4/29/2017 6:00 PM
Photo Credit: Claire LewisSun, Apr 30 | 10 – 11 AMFine Arts BuildingStudebaker Theater410 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10“Ayelet Waldman is fearless…You could call this book her war on the war on drugs, but it’s so much more, and so much more funny.” – Rebecca Solnit, author of A Field Guide to Getting LostNovelist Ayelet Waldman despaired managing her mood disorder—and her husband and children were suffering too. Then she tried something new: 10 micrograms of LSD. For a month, she joined the ranks of an underground but increasingly vocal group using therapeutic microdoses of LSD. In A Really Good Day: How Microdosing Made a Mega Difference in My Mood, My Marriage, and My Life, Waldman draws on her experience as a federal public defender to tell a story that ranges from the war on drugs to harm reduction to psychedelics research. CHF Associate Artistic Director Alison Cuddy will join Waldman in conversation.Preorder your copy of A Really Good Day through the CHF box office and save 20%. A book signing will follow this program.    Presenters:    Ayelet Waldman is the author of four novels as well as the essay collection Bad Mother: A Chronicle of Maternal Crimes, Minor Calamities, and Occasional Moments of Grace and the Mommy-Track mystery series. She was a federal public defender and taught a course on the legal implications of the war on drugs at the UC Berkeley School of Law. She lives in Berkeley, California, with her husband, Michael Chabon, and their four children.        Alison Cuddy is Associate Artistic Director at CHF. Prior to the Festival, she spent more than 10 years at WBEZ, the NPR affiliate in Chicago. There she helped launch Odyssey, a nationally syndicated talk show of arts and ideas, hosted the newsmagazine Eight Forty-Eight and reported on arts and culture. She holds a Masters of Arts in English from the University of Pittsburgh, and a BA in Cinema Studies from Concordia University. She is on the advisory board of the Chicago Film Archive and The Moth, and hosts Strange Brews, a podcast about craft beer.
300 | Better Living Through Microdosing: Ayelet Waldman

Photo Credit: Claire Lewis

Sun, Apr 30 | 10 – 11 AM
Fine Arts Building
Studebaker Theater
410 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

“Ayelet Waldman is fearless…You could call this book her war on the war on drugs, but it’s so much more, and so much more funny.” – Rebecca Solnit, author of A Field Guide to Getting Lost

Novelist Ayelet Waldman despaired managing her mood disorder—and her husband and children were suffering too. Then she tried something new: 10 micrograms of LSD. For a month, she joined the ranks of an underground but increasingly vocal group using therapeutic microdoses of LSD. In A Really Good Day: How Microdosing Made a Mega Difference in My Mood, My Marriage, and My Life, Waldman draws on her experience as a federal public defender to tell a story that ranges from the war on drugs to harm reduction to psychedelics research. CHF Associate Artistic Director Alison Cuddy will join Waldman in conversation.

Preorder your copy of A Really Good Day through the CHF box office and save 20%.

A book signing will follow this program.

Presenters:

Ayelet Waldman is the author of four novels as well as the essay collection Bad Mother: A Chronicle of Maternal Crimes, Minor Calamities, and Occasional Moments of Grace and the Mommy-Track mystery series. She was a federal public defender and taught a course on the legal implications of the war on drugs at the UC Berkeley School of Law. She lives in Berkeley, California, with her husband, Michael Chabon, and their four children.

Alison Cuddy is Associate Artistic Director at CHF. Prior to the Festival, she spent more than 10 years at WBEZ, the NPR affiliate in Chicago. There she helped launch Odyssey, a nationally syndicated talk show of arts and ideas, hosted the newsmagazine Eight Forty-Eight and reported on arts and culture. She holds a Masters of Arts in English from the University of Pittsburgh, and a BA in Cinema Studies from Concordia University. She is on the advisory board of the Chicago Film Archive and The Moth, and hosts Strange Brews, a podcast about craft beer.

4/30/2017 10:00 AM
Photo Credit: James WhiteSun, Apr 30 | 12 – 1 PMArt Institute of ChicagoRubloff Auditorium230 S Columbus Dr | Chicago, IL | 60603Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10Caitlyn Jenner has followed an extraordinary path, from Bruce Jenner, decathlon gold medal winner and national celebrity after the 1976 Olympics, to reality television star to transgender activist on the cover of Vanity Fair in 2015 and the docu-series I am Cait. For the launch of her highly anticipated memoir, The Secrets of My Life, she joins her co-author, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Buzz Bissinger, and CHF Associate Artistic Director Alison Cuddy for a conversation about men, women, and what it means to find one’s courage. Preorder your copy of The Secrets of My Life through the CHF box office and save 20%.  Presenters:    Caitlyn Jenner, formerly known as Bruce Jenner, is an American television personality and retired Olympic gold medal-winning decathlete.    Buzz Bissinger is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of five books, including Three Nights in August and Friday Night Lights. He is a contributing editor for Vanity Fair and has written for the New York Times, the New Republic, and many other publications.    Alison Cuddy is Associate Artistic Director at CHF. Prior to the Festival, she spent more than 10 years at WBEZ, the NPR affiliate in Chicago. There she helped launch Odyssey, a nationally syndicated talk show of arts and ideas, hosted the newsmagazine Eight Forty-Eight and reported on arts and culture. She holds a Masters of Arts in English from the University of Pittsburgh, and a BA in Cinema Studies from Concordia University. She is on the advisory board of the Chicago Film Archive and The Moth, and hosts Strange Brews, a podcast about craft beer.
301 | Caitlyn Jenner: Secrets

Photo Credit: James White

Sun, Apr 30 | 12 – 1 PM
Art Institute of Chicago
Rubloff Auditorium
230 S Columbus Dr | Chicago, IL | 60603
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

Caitlyn Jenner has followed an extraordinary path, from Bruce Jenner, decathlon gold medal winner and national celebrity after the 1976 Olympics, to reality television star to transgender activist on the cover of Vanity Fair in 2015 and the docu-series I am Cait. For the launch of her highly anticipated memoir, The Secrets of My Life, she joins her co-author, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Buzz Bissinger, and CHF Associate Artistic Director Alison Cuddy for a conversation about men, women, and what it means to find one’s courage.

Preorder your copy of The Secrets of My Life through the CHF box office and save 20%.

Presenters:

Caitlyn Jenner, formerly known as Bruce Jenner, is an American television personality and retired Olympic gold medal-winning decathlete.




Buzz Bissinger is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of five books, including Three Nights in August and Friday Night Lights. He is a contributing editor for Vanity Fair and has written for the New York Times, the New Republic, and many other publications.

Alison Cuddy is Associate Artistic Director at CHF. Prior to the Festival, she spent more than 10 years at WBEZ, the NPR affiliate in Chicago. There she helped launch Odyssey, a nationally syndicated talk show of arts and ideas, hosted the newsmagazine Eight Forty-Eight and reported on arts and culture. She holds a Masters of Arts in English from the University of Pittsburgh, and a BA in Cinema Studies from Concordia University. She is on the advisory board of the Chicago Film Archive and The Moth, and hosts Strange Brews, a podcast about craft beer.

4/30/2017 12:00 PM
Sun, Apr 30 | 12 – 1 PMChicago Cultural CenterPreston Bradley Hall, 3rd Floor South78 E Washington St | Chicago, IL | 60602Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10Why do we find some objects cute? Since the 1970s, kawaii (Japanese for “cute style”) has become increasingly prominent, here and abroad: geisha cars, Gwen Stefani’s Harajuku Lovers perfume bottles, Chanel’s “China Doll” handbags. Like the Mammy cookie jar of old, the stylized and racial figures on salt shakers or toys are racial kitsch. But does their cuteness change how we view them? Leslie Bow, professor of English and Asian American Studies at the University of Wisconsin, will ask us to reassess how we feel about the objects around us.Presenters:    Leslie Bow is the Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of English and Asian American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  She wrote the award-winning ‘Partly Colored’: Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South (2010) and Betrayal and Other Acts of Subversion: Feminism, Sexual Politics, Asian American Women's Literature (2001). She has published widely on fetishism, stereotyping, and segregation. Her current work explores race and desire in the public sphere, focusing on the ways in which nonhuman objects perform race and ethnicity.
302 | Cute Stuff
Sun, Apr 30 | 12 – 1 PM
Chicago Cultural Center
Preston Bradley Hall, 3rd Floor South
78 E Washington St | Chicago, IL | 60602
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

Why do we find some objects cute? Since the 1970s, kawaii (Japanese for “cute style”) has become increasingly prominent, here and abroad: geisha cars, Gwen Stefani’s Harajuku Lovers perfume bottles, Chanel’s “China Doll” handbags. Like the Mammy cookie jar of old, the stylized and racial figures on salt shakers or toys are racial kitsch. But does their cuteness change how we view them? Leslie Bow, professor of English and Asian American Studies at the University of Wisconsin, will ask us to reassess how we feel about the objects around us.

Presenters:

Leslie Bow is the Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of English and Asian American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She wrote the award-winning ‘Partly Colored’: Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South (2010) and Betrayal and Other Acts of Subversion: Feminism, Sexual Politics, Asian American Women's Literature (2001). She has published widely on fetishism, stereotyping, and segregation. Her current work explores race and desire in the public sphere, focusing on the ways in which nonhuman objects perform race and ethnicity.

4/30/2017 12:00 PM
Photo Credit: Beowulf SheehanSun, Apr 30 | 12 – 1 PMFine Arts BuildingStudebaker Theater410 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10“Haslett is one of the country's most talented writers” – The Wall Street JournalPulitzer Prize and National Book Award finalist Adam Haslett comes to CHF to discuss his latest novel Imagine Me Gone, which Tony Kushner described as “one of the great books about loss and mourning…This magnificent work of art has overwhelmed me and broken my heart.” A searing, gut-wrenching, and yet frequently hilarious story of a family and their father’s mental illness, Haslett’s work brings alive the love of a mother for her children, the often inescapable devotion of siblings, and the legacy of a parent's pain.    Preorder your copy of Imagine Me Gone through the CHF box office and save 20%. A book signing will follow this program.    Presenters:    Adam Haslett is the author of the short story collection You Are Not a Stranger Here, a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award finalist, and the novel Union Atlantic, winner of the Lambda Literary Award and finalist for the Commonwealth Prize. His books have been translated into eighteen languages, and he has received the Strauss Living Award from the American Academy of Arts & Letters, the Berlin Prize from the American Academy in Berlin, the PEN/Malamud Award, and fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller Foundations. He lives in New York City.
303 | Adam Haslett: Imagine Me Gone

Photo Credit: Beowulf Sheehan

Sun, Apr 30 | 12 – 1 PM
Fine Arts Building
Studebaker Theater
410 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

“Haslett is one of the country's most talented writers” – The Wall Street Journal

Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award finalist Adam Haslett comes to CHF to discuss his latest novel Imagine Me Gone, which Tony Kushner described as “one of the great books about loss and mourning…This magnificent work of art has overwhelmed me and broken my heart.” A searing, gut-wrenching, and yet frequently hilarious story of a family and their father’s mental illness, Haslett’s work brings alive the love of a mother for her children, the often inescapable devotion of siblings, and the legacy of a parent's pain.

Preorder your copy of Imagine Me Gone through the CHF box office and save 20%.

A book signing will follow this program.

Presenters:

Adam Haslett is the author of the short story collection You Are Not a Stranger Here, a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award finalist, and the novel Union Atlantic, winner of the Lambda Literary Award and finalist for the Commonwealth Prize. His books have been translated into eighteen languages, and he has received the Strauss Living Award from the American Academy of Arts & Letters, the Berlin Prize from the American Academy in Berlin, the PEN/Malamud Award, and fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller Foundations. He lives in New York City.

4/30/2017 12:00 PM
Photo Credit: Deborah FeingoldSun, Apr 30 | 2 – 3 PMArt Institute of ChicagoRubloff Auditorium230 S Columbus Dr | Chicago, IL | 60603Members: $26Public: $29Students and Teachers: $20“Mukherjee swaddles his medical rigor with rhapsodic tenderness, surprising vulnerability, and occasional flashes of pure poetry” – Andrew Solomon, Washington PostAcclaimed cancer physician and author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Emperor of All Maladies, Siddhartha Mukherjee comes to CHF to discuss his most recent work, The Gene, a magnificent history of the gene and a response to the defining question of the future: What becomes of being human when we learn to “read” and “write” our own genetic information. Mukherjee interweaves science, social history, and the story of his own family to explain the powerful science of genetics and to grapple with the extraordinary influence of heredity on our lives, personalities, identities, and fates.Ticket purchase includes a paperback copy of The Gene. An option for 1 book + 2 tickets is available through the box office at (312) 494-9509.A book signing will follow this program.        This program is generously underwritten by Anita and Prabha Sinha.Presenters:    Siddhartha Mukherjee is the author of The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer, winner of the 2011 Pulitzer Prize. An assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University and a cancer physician, he graduated from Stanford University, University of Oxford, and Harvard Medical School.
304 | Siddhartha Mukherjee: The Gene

Photo Credit: Deborah Feingold

Sun, Apr 30 | 2 – 3 PM
Art Institute of Chicago
Rubloff Auditorium
230 S Columbus Dr | Chicago, IL | 60603
  • Members: $26
  • Public: $29
  • Students and Teachers: $20

“Mukherjee swaddles his medical rigor with rhapsodic tenderness, surprising vulnerability, and occasional flashes of pure poetry” – Andrew Solomon, Washington Post

Acclaimed cancer physician and author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Emperor of All Maladies, Siddhartha Mukherjee comes to CHF to discuss his most recent work, The Gene, a magnificent history of the gene and a response to the defining question of the future: What becomes of being human when we learn to “read” and “write” our own genetic information. Mukherjee interweaves science, social history, and the story of his own family to explain the powerful science of genetics and to grapple with the extraordinary influence of heredity on our lives, personalities, identities, and fates.

Ticket purchase includes a paperback copy of The Gene. An option for 1 book + 2 tickets is available through the box office at (312) 494-9509.

A book signing will follow this program.

This program is generously underwritten by Anita and Prabha Sinha.

Presenters:

Siddhartha Mukherjee is the author of The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer, winner of the 2011 Pulitzer Prize. An assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University and a cancer physician, he graduated from Stanford University, University of Oxford, and Harvard Medical School.

4/30/2017 2:00 PM
Sun, Apr 30 | 2 – 3 PMChicago Cultural CenterPreston Bradley Hall, 3rd Floor South78 E Washington St | Chicago, IL | 60602Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10The recent national conversation about race has included voting, prisons, and policing. Add to that list museums, which have begun to contend with histories of racism—in society and in their own institutions—including reflections in the very collections they’ve acquired or manage. Join David Pilgrim of the Jim Crow Museum, Carlos Tortolero of the National Museum of Mexican Art, and Chip Colwell of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science and the author of Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits, for a conversation about changing curatorial practices and efforts at community engagement.Preorder your copy of Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits through the CHF box office and save 20%. A book signing will follow this program.    Presenters:    Chip Colwell is Senior Curator of Anthropology at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. He has published ten books, most recently Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits: Inside the Fight to Reclaim Native America’s Culture (University of Chicago Press). His work has been highlighted in such venues as The New York Times, The Guardian, Salon, and Indian Country Today. He is also the founding editor-in-chief of sapiens.org, a popular online magazine about anthropological discoveries and thinking.        Carlos Tortolero is the Founder and President of the National Museum of Mexican Art (NMMA) in Chicago. The NMMA is the first Latino museum accredited by the American Alliance of Museums.  The National Museum of Mexican Art has become a national model for its exhibits, performances, arts education programs, advocacy of cultural equity issues, and as a model for how museums need to change in today's society. Tortolero has received two honorary doctorates and has served on numerous boards. Tortolero has written articles for national and international publications.  He has also made presentations across the U.S. and internationally.        David Pilgrim, PhD, is the founder and Director of the Jim Crow Museum, the nation’s largest publicly accessible collection of racist objects, located at Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Michigan, where he is a Distinguished Teacher and Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion. He is the author of Understanding Jim Crow: Using Racist Memorabilia to Teach Tolerance and Promote Social Justice. The book explains the museum’s vision and work, where the objects are used as tools to teach about race, race relations, and racism.
305 | Museums and Race
Sun, Apr 30 | 2 – 3 PM
Chicago Cultural Center
Preston Bradley Hall, 3rd Floor South
78 E Washington St | Chicago, IL | 60602
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

The recent national conversation about race has included voting, prisons, and policing. Add to that list museums, which have begun to contend with histories of racism—in society and in their own institutions—including reflections in the very collections they’ve acquired or manage. Join David Pilgrim of the Jim Crow Museum, Carlos Tortolero of the National Museum of Mexican Art, and Chip Colwell of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science and the author of Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits, for a conversation about changing curatorial practices and efforts at community engagement.

Preorder your copy of Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits through the CHF box office and save 20%.

A book signing will follow this program.

Presenters:

Chip Colwell is Senior Curator of Anthropology at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. He has published ten books, most recently Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits: Inside the Fight to Reclaim Native America’s Culture (University of Chicago Press). His work has been highlighted in such venues as The New York Times, The Guardian, Salon, and Indian Country Today. He is also the founding editor-in-chief of sapiens.org, a popular online magazine about anthropological discoveries and thinking.

Carlos Tortolero is the Founder and President of the National Museum of Mexican Art (NMMA) in Chicago. The NMMA is the first Latino museum accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. The National Museum of Mexican Art has become a national model for its exhibits, performances, arts education programs, advocacy of cultural equity issues, and as a model for how museums need to change in today's society. Tortolero has received two honorary doctorates and has served on numerous boards. Tortolero has written articles for national and international publications. He has also made presentations across the U.S. and internationally.

David Pilgrim, PhD, is the founder and Director of the Jim Crow Museum, the nation’s largest publicly accessible collection of racist objects, located at Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Michigan, where he is a Distinguished Teacher and Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion. He is the author of Understanding Jim Crow: Using Racist Memorabilia to Teach Tolerance and Promote Social Justice. The book explains the museum’s vision and work, where the objects are used as tools to teach about race, race relations, and racism.

4/30/2017 2:00 PM
Photo courtesy of the artist.        Sun, Apr 30 | 2 – 3 PMFine Arts BuildingStudebaker Theater410 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10“One of the most acclaimed chroniclers of youth culture and the affluent.” – TimeAcclaimed filmmaker and photographer Lauren Greenfield has built a fascinating body of work exploring how everyone, rich or poor, has been affected by a growing world-wide culture of consumerism. Director of the critically acclaimed feature-length documentary The Queen of Versailles, Greenfield’s highly anticipated new monograph, Lauren Greenfield: Generation Wealth, is an epic photographic narrative covering the last 25 years of our obsession with wealth and materialism. Don’t miss her stunning presentation!Preorder your copy of Generation Wealth through the CHF box office and save 20%. A book signing will follow this program.Lauren Greenfield is proud to represent Canon USA's Explorers of Light Program.Presenters:    Lauren Greenfield is an Emmy Award–winning filmmaker and photographer, and considered a preeminent chronicler of consumerism, youth culture, and gender identity. Her documentary The Queen of Versailles won the Best Director Award at Sundance in 2012. Greenfield’s photographs have been widely published, exhibited, and collected by museums around the world. Her #LikeAGirl video was seen by 214 million global viewers and garnered more than one hundred awards.        Milos Stehlik is founder and artistic director of Facets Multimedia, a leading national media arts center. Since 1975, he's been responsible for Facets' public programs which include screenigns of foreign and independent films and video on a daily basis, the Chicago International Children's Film Festival and associated educational programs, as well Facets Video, a pioneering catalog of over 65,000 foreign, independent, classic American, silent, experimental, fine arts and quality children’s films in digital formats.
306 | Lauren Greenfield: Generation Wealth

Photo courtesy of the artist.

Sun, Apr 30 | 2 – 3 PM
Fine Arts Building
Studebaker Theater
410 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

“One of the most acclaimed chroniclers of youth culture and the affluent.” – Time

Acclaimed filmmaker and photographer Lauren Greenfield has built a fascinating body of work exploring how everyone, rich or poor, has been affected by a growing world-wide culture of consumerism. Director of the critically acclaimed feature-length documentary The Queen of Versailles, Greenfield’s highly anticipated new monograph, Lauren Greenfield: Generation Wealth, is an epic photographic narrative covering the last 25 years of our obsession with wealth and materialism. Don’t miss her stunning presentation!

Preorder your copy of Generation Wealth through the CHF box office and save 20%.

A book signing will follow this program.

Lauren Greenfield is proud to represent Canon USA's Explorers of Light Program.

Presenters:

Lauren Greenfield is an Emmy Award–winning filmmaker and photographer, and considered a preeminent chronicler of consumerism, youth culture, and gender identity. Her documentary The Queen of Versailles won the Best Director Award at Sundance in 2012. Greenfield’s photographs have been widely published, exhibited, and collected by museums around the world. Her #LikeAGirl video was seen by 214 million global viewers and garnered more than one hundred awards.

Milos Stehlik is founder and artistic director of Facets Multimedia, a leading national media arts center. Since 1975, he's been responsible for Facets' public programs which include screenigns of foreign and independent films and video on a daily basis, the Chicago International Children's Film Festival and associated educational programs, as well Facets Video, a pioneering catalog of over 65,000 foreign, independent, classic American, silent, experimental, fine arts and quality children’s films in digital formats.

4/30/2017 2:00 PM
Sun, Apr 30 | 2 –3 PMVenue SIX10Feinberg Theater610 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10The U.S. health care system is the most expensive in the world, yet we fall far behind other industrialized nations on measures such as the number of uninsured, infant mortality, and life expectancy. Physician David Ansell, argues that widespread social inequality drives health disparities in life expectancy among minorities and the poor. Join Ansell, whose previous book County covered the history of one of America’s oldest urban public hospitals and whose latest, The Death Gap, explores why these health disparities persist, for a discussion with the University of Chicago’s Harold Pollack about the state of American health care and what can be done to close our disturbing death gap. Preorder your copy of The Death Gap through the CHF box office and save 20%. A book signing will follow this program.    Presenters:    David Ansell, MD, MPH is the Senior Vice President for Community Health Equity at Rush University Medical Center. In 2007 he co-founded the Metropolitan Chicago Breast Cancer Taskforce, a nonprofit that focuses on eliminating the racial disparities in breast cancer mortality. His books include the memoir County: Life, Death and Politics at Chicago’s Public Hospital, and the forthcoming The Death Gap: How Inequality Kills. Dr. Ansell graduated from SUNY Upstate Medical University and received his Masters of Public Health from the University of Illinois.        Harold Pollack is the Helen Ross Professor at the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. He is also an Affiliate Professor in the Biological Sciences Collegiate Division and the Department of Public Health Sciences. He co-directs The University of Chicago Crime Lab and is a committee member of the school’s Center for Health Administration Studies. He has published widely on poverty, policy and public health. His research appears in such journals as Addiction, Journal of the American Medical Association, and American Journal of Public Health.
307 | The Death Gap: Social Inequity and Health
Sun, Apr 30 | 2 –3 PM
Venue SIX10
Feinberg Theater
610 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

The U.S. health care system is the most expensive in the world, yet we fall far behind other industrialized nations on measures such as the number of uninsured, infant mortality, and life expectancy. Physician David Ansell, argues that widespread social inequality drives health disparities in life expectancy among minorities and the poor. Join Ansell, whose previous book County covered the history of one of America’s oldest urban public hospitals and whose latest, The Death Gap, explores why these health disparities persist, for a discussion with the University of Chicago’s Harold Pollack about the state of American health care and what can be done to close our disturbing death gap.

Preorder your copy of The Death Gap through the CHF box office and save 20%.

A book signing will follow this program.

Presenters:

David Ansell, MD, MPH is the Senior Vice President for Community Health Equity at Rush University Medical Center. In 2007 he co-founded the Metropolitan Chicago Breast Cancer Taskforce, a nonprofit that focuses on eliminating the racial disparities in breast cancer mortality. His books include the memoir County: Life, Death and Politics at Chicago’s Public Hospital, and the forthcoming The Death Gap: How Inequality Kills. Dr. Ansell graduated from SUNY Upstate Medical University and received his Masters of Public Health from the University of Illinois.

Harold Pollack is the Helen Ross Professor at the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. He is also an Affiliate Professor in the Biological Sciences Collegiate Division and the Department of Public Health Sciences. He co-directs The University of Chicago Crime Lab and is a committee member of the school’s Center for Health Administration Studies. He has published widely on poverty, policy and public health. His research appears in such journals as Addiction, Journal of the American Medical Association, and American Journal of Public Health.

4/30/2017 2:00 PM
Photo Credit: Stephen MaturenSun, Apr 30 | 4 – 5 PMFine Arts BuildingStudebaker Theater410 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605Members: $23Public: $26Students and Teachers: $20John Waters, the acclaimed director and pop icon behind Hairspray, Pink Flamingos, and Cry-Baby, injects chaos into his work and encourages more of it in everyday life. In his latest book, Make Trouble, Waters uses his sly wisdom to advise a younger generation to be nosy and horrify us with new ideas—but he also urges anyone embarking on a creative path to be pragmatic and disciplined. Chicago Tribune theater critic Chris Jones joins Waters in conversation as he shares his guidelines and reveals the truths of a subversive life as few others can.Ticket purchase includes a copy of Make Trouble. An option for 1 book + 2 tickets is available through the box office at (312) 494-9509.A book signing will follow this program.    Presenters:    John Waters is a filmmaker, writer, actor and visual artist best known for his films, including  Pink Flamingos, Serial Mom, and Hairspray, which was adapted into a long-running Broadway musical. The author of seven books, including the New York Times bestsellers Role Models and Carsick, he performs his one-man spoken word shows regularly in the United States and abroad. Waters lives in his hometown of Baltimore, Maryland.        Chris Jones is the chief theater critic for the Chicago Tribune. Prior to joining the Tribune 15 years ago, Jones served as the touring theater critic for Variety and Daily Variety. Jones spent 10 years teaching at Northern Illinois University, where he served as both an associate professor and as assistant chair of the School of Theatre and Dance. He also served as associate dean of Depaul University Theatre School, where he continues to be an adjunct professor. A native of Manchester, England, Jones earned a doctorate from Ohio State University in 1989. He lives in Evanston.
308 | John Waters in Conversation with Chris Jones

Photo Credit: Stephen Maturen

Sun, Apr 30 | 4 – 5 PM
Fine Arts Building
Studebaker Theater
410 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605
  • Members: $23
  • Public: $26
  • Students and Teachers: $20

John Waters, the acclaimed director and pop icon behind Hairspray, Pink Flamingos, and Cry-Baby, injects chaos into his work and encourages more of it in everyday life. In his latest book, Make Trouble, Waters uses his sly wisdom to advise a younger generation to be nosy and horrify us with new ideas—but he also urges anyone embarking on a creative path to be pragmatic and disciplined. Chicago Tribune theater critic Chris Jones joins Waters in conversation as he shares his guidelines and reveals the truths of a subversive life as few others can.

Ticket purchase includes a copy of Make Trouble. An option for 1 book + 2 tickets is available through the box office at (312) 494-9509.

A book signing will follow this program.

Presenters:

John Waters is a filmmaker, writer, actor and visual artist best known for his films, including Pink Flamingos, Serial Mom, and Hairspray, which was adapted into a long-running Broadway musical. The author of seven books, including the New York Times bestsellers Role Models and Carsick, he performs his one-man spoken word shows regularly in the United States and abroad. Waters lives in his hometown of Baltimore, Maryland.

Chris Jones is the chief theater critic for the Chicago Tribune. Prior to joining the Tribune 15 years ago, Jones served as the touring theater critic for Variety and Daily Variety. Jones spent 10 years teaching at Northern Illinois University, where he served as both an associate professor and as assistant chair of the School of Theatre and Dance. He also served as associate dean of Depaul University Theatre School, where he continues to be an adjunct professor. A native of Manchester, England, Jones earned a doctorate from Ohio State University in 1989. He lives in Evanston.

4/30/2017 4:00 PM
Sun, Apr 30 | 4 – 5 PMVenue SIX10Feinberg Theater610 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10Global politics and its power bases are in transition. President Donald Trump promises a dramatic change in U.S. foreign policy—less intervention around the world, more focus on America’s national interests. This isn’t a new idea, but given today’s shifting relations with Russia and China, it is one that may fundamentally remake the existing world order. Harvard University professor and Foreign Policy columnist Stephen Walt has taken issue with the foreign policy visions of both the 44th and 45th Presidents. He will be joined by Steve Edwards of the Institute of Politics for a pointed conversation about the future of global relations.    This program is generously underwritten by longstanding supporters Bill and Penny Obenshain.Presenters:    Stephen M. Walt is a Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He previously taught at Princeton and at the University of Chicago. He has been a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and received the International Studies Association’s Distinguished Senior Scholar award. His most recent book, The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy was a New York Times best-seller and has been translated into more than twenty languages.  He is a contributing editor and weekly columnist at Foreign Policy.        Steve Edwards is Executive Director of the Institute of Politics at the University of Chicago. He has covered politics as a journalist and program host for over two decades, his work appearing on the BBC, Bloomberg News, and PBS. At WBEZ, he hosted The Afternoon Shift and Eight Forty-Eight. He also hosted the weekly show The Best Game in Town, and was the correspondent for a BBC documentary on Chicago’s politics. He was a Knight-Wallace Fellow at the University of Michigan and earned his A.B. in political science from Amherst College.
309 | The New World Order
Sun, Apr 30 | 4 – 5 PM
Venue SIX10
Feinberg Theater
610 S Michigan Ave | Chicago, IL | 60605
  • Members: $12
  • Public: $15
  • Students and Teachers: $10

Global politics and its power bases are in transition. President Donald Trump promises a dramatic change in U.S. foreign policy—less intervention around the world, more focus on America’s national interests. This isn’t a new idea, but given today’s shifting relations with Russia and China, it is one that may fundamentally remake the existing world order. Harvard University professor and Foreign Policy columnist Stephen Walt has taken issue with the foreign policy visions of both the 44th and 45th Presidents. He will be joined by Steve Edwards of the Institute of Politics for a pointed conversation about the future of global relations.

This program is generously underwritten by longstanding supporters Bill and Penny Obenshain.

Presenters:

Stephen M. Walt is a Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He previously taught at Princeton and at the University of Chicago. He has been a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and received the International Studies Association’s Distinguished Senior Scholar award. His most recent book, The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy was a New York Times best-seller and has been translated into more than twenty languages. He is a contributing editor and weekly columnist at Foreign Policy.

Steve Edwards is Executive Director of the Institute of Politics at the University of Chicago. He has covered politics as a journalist and program host for over two decades, his work appearing on the BBC, Bloomberg News, and PBS. At WBEZ, he hosted The Afternoon Shift and Eight Forty-Eight. He also hosted the weekly show The Best Game in Town, and was the correspondent for a BBC documentary on Chicago’s politics. He was a Knight-Wallace Fellow at the University of Michigan and earned his A.B. in political science from Amherst College.

4/30/2017 4:00 PM
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