Citizens | October 24-Nov 8, 2015 | Download PDF | Tickets go on sale to CHF Members on Sept 8 at 10 AM and to the public on Sept 14 at 10 AM
Hot Tickets Book Nerd Chicagoan Foodie
Photo by Patrice GilbertTuesday, September 15 | 5:30–6:30 PMFourth Presbyterian Church of Chicago, Main SanctuaryN Michigan Ave at Delaware Pl | Chicago, IL | 60611Members: $15Public: $20Students & Teachers: $10Walter Isaacson is the critically acclaimed biographer of such brilliant and complicated men as Steve Jobs, Albert Einstein, Benjamin Franklin, and Henry Kissinger. Isaacson is also president and CEO of the Aspen Institute, a nonpartisan educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, DC. On the heels of the successful publication of his book The Innovators: How a Group ofHackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution, this former CNN chairman and Time magazine editor comes to Chicago to discuss creative citizens and the power of the humanities in the 21st century.Following his public program, Isaacson will speak as part of a panel discussion at the CHF Gala Benefit. Gala attendees receive free VIP tickets to this public event.Current Charter Humanist members receive Red Badge access to this event with VIP tickets at the door.Presenters:Walter Isaacson is President and CEO of the Aspen Institute, a nonpartisan educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, DC. He has been chairman and CEO of CNN and editor of Time magazine. Isaacson’s most recent book is The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution. He is also the author of Steve Jobs and several other bestselling biographies. Isaacson is a graduate of Harvard College and of Pembroke College of Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar.
100 | Walter Isaacson
9/15/2015 5:30 PM
Photo by Al ZayedWednesday, Sept 16 | 6-8 PMHaymarket Pub & Brewery737 W Randolph St | Chicago, IL | 60661Young Professionals: $15Enjoy food and drinks with fellow Shortlisters to kickoff CHF 2015, Citizens. Your ticket includes:AppetizersA pint of Haymarket beer$15 off the 2015 Shortlist Package*, featuring Aasif Mandvi, Wendell Pierce, and Gaby PachecoThe chance to win prizes from Steppenwolf Theatre, Lyric Opera, Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me!, and moreCitizens-inspired program by community artists and leaders*You must purchase the 2015 Shortlist Package in-person at the Shortlist Kickoff Party to receive this discount.Sponsors:
101 | Shortlist Kickoff Party
9/16/2015 6:00 PM
Photo by Stanley StaniskiSaturday, October 24 | 11 AM-12 PMCahn Auditorium600 Emerson St. | Evanston, IL | 60208Members: $15Public: $20Students and Teachers: $10Azar Nafisi is the beloved author of Reading Lolita in Tehran – a personal account of teaching literary classics to students in Iran. Her newest work – The Republic of Imagination – is a heartening tribute to reading in a democratic society. Part polemic, part memoir, it's a reading of her favorite American novels: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Babbitt, and The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, among others. Through her passionate prose, she invites us to become citizens of her imaginary republic, a country where the villains are conformity and orthodoxy, and the only passport to entry is a free mind and a willingness to dream.Preorder your copy of The Republic of Imagination for $14 through the CHF box office for pickup at the program.A book signing will follow this program.Presenters:Azar Nafisi is the beloved author of Reading Lolita in Tehran – a personal account of teaching literary classics to students in Iran. Her newest work— The Republic of Imagination—isa heartening tribute to reading in a democratic society. Part polemic, part memoir, and fully a reading of her favorite American novels: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Babbitt,and The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter,among others.
200 | Azar Nafisi: Republic of Imagination
10/24/2015 11:00 AM
Photo by Stanley StaniskiSaturday, October 24 | 12-1 PMBienen School of Music, Mary B. Galvin Recital Hall70 Arts Circle Dr | Evanston, IL | 60208Members: $12Public: $15Students and Teachers: $10For nearly 50 years, Richard Sennett has been one of our most respected thinkers about cities, labor, and culture. Author of such classics of sociology as The Fall of Public Man and The Hidden Injuries of Class, Sennett has more recently meditated on what it means to really make something in our automated, consumerist world. Sennett will take a bird's-eye view of citizenship today, and then artist Geof Oppenheimer will join him in conversation.This program is generously underwritten by Lynn Hauser and Neil Ross and is presented in partnership with the Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art at Northwestern University.Presenters:Richard Sennett is the Centennial Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics and University Professor of the Humanities at New York University. Sennett has studied social ties in cities, and the effects of urban living on individuals in the modern world. He has been a Fellow of The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and of the Royal Society of Literature, and is the founding director of the New York Institute for the Humanities.Geof Oppenheimer's works across multiple mediums including video productions, and photography, and questions the ways in which political and social structures are encoded in images and objects and how meaning is formed in the modern world. His work has been exhibited at a variety of venues such as PS1/MOMA, The Contemporary Museum, Baltimore; The MCA, Chicago; SITE Santa Fe; The Aspen Art Museum; and AGORA 4th Athens Biennale. His exhibition Big Boss and the Ecstasy of Pressures is on display at The Block Museum of Art at Northwestern University.
201 | Citizen Sociologist: Richard Sennett
10/24/2015 12:00 PM
Saturday, October 24 | 12:30-1:30 PMHarris Hall, Room 1071881 Sheridan Rd | Evanston, IL | 60208Members: $9Public: $12Students and Teachers: $5Chris Abani is a true citizen of the world. The self-identified “global Igbo” is the son of an English mother and a Nigerian father who wrote his first novel at age 16. Through his prolific and varied writings – which include novels, novellas, plays, and poems – Abani has sought to capture the specifics of his own experience while conveying the political and emotional dramas that transcend and tie together disparate cultures. The Northwestern University professor will share his exploration of literature’s capacity to connect humanity.A book signing will follow this program.Presenters:Chris Abani is a novelist, poet, essayist, screenwriter and playwright, and has taught in numerous countries around the world ranging across sub Saharan Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia, and Europe. His fields of interest include African Poetics, 20th Century British and American Literature, West African Music, Postcolonial and Transnational Theory, Robotics and Consciousness, Yoruba and Igbo Philosophy and Religion. He is the recipient of the PEN USA Freedom-to-Write Award, a Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, a PEN Beyond the Margins Award, the PEN Hemingway Book Prize and a Guggenheim Award.
202 | Chris Abani: Global Igbo
10/24/2015 12:30 PM
Saturday, October 24 | 12:30-1:30 PMNorris University Center, McCormick Auditorium1999 Campus Dr | Evanston, IL | 60208Members: $9Public: $12Students and Teachers: $5John Merrow has spent his career shining a light on the political and social dynamics of our public education system. Founding president of Learning Matters and veteran education reporter for PBS, NPR, and dozens of national publications, Merrow offers a critical and insightful examination of our nation’s schools and the education our children receive. With warm storytelling and thoughtful, compelling case studies, Merrow paints a vibrant and inspiring picture of why and how we must transform – not reform – our schools.This program is presented in partnership with the Dolores Kohl Education Foundation.Presenters:John Merrow's 41-year career in journalism began with NPR in 1974. Along the way he has received two Peabody Awards, the George Polk Award, several Emmy nominations, and four CINE Golden Eagles. His books include The Influence of Teachers, Choosing Excellence, and Declining by Degrees. Before becoming a journalist, Merrow taught English in junior high, high school, a Black college, and federal prison. He earned an AB from Dartmouth, an MA in American Studies from Indiana, and a doctorate from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.
203 | Transforming Our Schools: John Merrow
10/24/2015 12:30 PM
Photo by Yanai YechielSaturday, October 24 | 1-2 PMCahn Auditorium600 Emerson St | Evanston, IL | 60208Members: $9Public: $12Students and Teachers: $5Lawrence Lessig is a tireless defender of individual rights and our ability to participate fully in American life. An activist, law professor, and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University, Lessig has garnered praise for his energetic arguments in favor of copyright reform and net neutrality. From conservative roots, and clerkships with Richard Posner and Antonin Scalia, Lessig has forged a unique path in contemporary political thought. He will share aspirational and practical ways we can change money’s corrupting influence in our political process.Presenters:Lawrence Lessig is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership at Harvard Law School and founder of Rootstrikers, a network of activists leading the fight against government corruption. He has authored numerous books, including Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Our Congress—and a Plan to Stop It, Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Free Culture, and Remix. He has received numerous awards, including the Free Software Foundation’s Freedom Award, Fastcase 50 Award and being named one of Scientific American's Top 50 Visionaries.
204 | Fixing the Republic
10/24/2015 1:00 PM
Photo courtesy of NASA/JPL-CaltechSaturday, October 24 | 2-3 PMBienen School of Music, Mary B. Galvin Recital Hall70 Arts Circle Dr | Evanston, IL | 60208Members: $9Public: $12Students and Teachers: $5The story of American space exploration is generally a tale of the bold vision and brave feats of adventurous men, from John Glenn and Neil Armstrong to President John F. Kennedy. But look beyond the astronauts and you’ll find an equally daring group of women. Hired at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the 1940s and 1950s, these women became the first computer scientists at NASA. In this program about her forthcoming book, Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us from Missiles to the Moon to Mars and Beyond, Nathalia Holt explores the essential role these women played in the greatest missions in the history of US space exploration.Presenters:Nathalia Holt is the author of Cured: The People who Defeated HIV and Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us from Missiles to the Moon to Mars. Her work has appeared in numerous publications including the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Atlantic, Slate, Popular Science, and Time. She is a microbiologist who has trained at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard University, University of Southern California and Tulane University.Barbara Paulson was born in Columbus, OH in 1928. She grew up in a family of 6 with two older sisters and one younger brother. Her father died when she was 12. She attended Ohio State University for one year. When she was nineteen, her family moved to Pasadena, Califonia, where she worked at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for over 42 years, retiring in 1993. In 2003, Paulson’s husband died and in 2011 she sold their home in California and moved to Iowa to be near her two daughters and their families.
205 | Rocket Girls
10/24/2015 2:00 PM
Saturday, October 24 | 2:30-3:30 PMHarris Hall, Room 1071881 Sheridan Rd | Evanston, IL | 60208Members: $9Public: $12Students and Teachers: $5The Terminator movies and astrophysicist Stephen Hawking warned us about the “rise of the machines.” Northwestern University professor Sylvester Johnson is more interested in exploring what human subjectivity looks like as computers begin to outpace and outperform us. Using interviews with developers, Johnson examines concrete relationships among humans and machines to think about the public policy and philosophical implications of artificial intelligence.Presenters:Sylvester A. Johnson is Associate Professor of African American Studies and Religious Studies at Northwestern University. His research examines religion, race, and empire in Atlantic geographies since the 1500s; American religion and sexuality; and the humanistic challenges posed by intelligent machines. He has most recently authored African American Religions, 1500–2000: Colonialism, Democracy, and Freedom (Cambridge University Press 2015). His study of intelligent machines focuses on their challenge to human exceptionalism and their role in the future of biopolitics. Johnson is also collaborating with NU technologists to develop a digital scholarly edition of an early modern text.
206 | Of Machines and Men
10/24/2015 2:30 PM
Photo by Denise Applewhite / Princeton UniversitySaturday, October 24 | 2:30-3:30 PMNorris University Center, McCormick Auditorium1999 Campus Dr | Evanston, IL | 60208Members: $9Public: $12Students and Teachers: $5Forty years ago, moral philosopher Peter Singer changed our world with his groundbreaking book, Animal Liberation – a bold argument that helped launch the animal rights movement. Since then, Singer has become the world’s most widely read philosopher. He has confronted difficult issues such as euthanasia, abortion, and the relationship between world poverty and affluence. In his latest book, The Most Good You Can Do, Singer takes his argument for “effective altruism” into new domains. In a world of ever-increasing disparities of wealth and power, Singer’s ideas on how we can all exercise philanthropy have never been more pertinent.This program is generously underwritten by The Chicago Community Trust. A book signing will follow this program.Presenters:Peter Singer is Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics in the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University and Laureate Professor at the University of Melbourne. His books include Animal Liberation, Practical Ethics, The Life You Can Save, The Point of View of the Universe, and The Most Good You Can Do. In 2014 the Gottlieb Duttweiler Institute ranked him third on its list of Global Thought Leaders, and Time has included him among the world’s 100 most influential people. An Australian, in 2012 he was made a Companion to the Order of Australia, his country’s highest civilian honor.Sponsor:
207 | Peter Singer: The Most Good You Can Do
10/24/2015 2:30 PM
Photo by Nina SubinSaturday, October 24 | 3-4 PMCahn Auditorium600 Emerson St | Evanston, IL | 60208Members: $9Public: $12Students and Teachers: $5Ta-Nehisi Coates has become one of the most powerful writers today. A staffer for the Atlantic and author of a memoir, The Beautiful Struggle, he shares his stunning and evocative reflections on what it’s like to inhabit a black male body in contemporary America. In Between the World and Me he asks how we, as a nation, can reckon with our fraught history and free ourselves from a troubling legacy. Taking us from the Civil War battlefield to Chicago’s South Side, Coates attempts to answer one of the most pressing and relevant questions of our times.Preorder your copy of Between the World and Me  for $20 through the CHF box office for pickup at the program.A book signing will follow this program.Presenters:Ta-Nehisi Coates is a National Correspondent for the Atlantic, the author of The Beautiful Struggle, a former writer for the Village Voice, and a contributor to Time, O, and the New York Times Magazine. Among the prizes he’s received for his writing are the Hillman Prize for Opinion and Analysis Journalism, the George Polk Award for his Atlantic cover story, “The Case for Reparations,” and his Atlantic blog was named by Time as one of the 25 Best in the World.
208 | Between the World and Me: Ta-Nehisi Coates
10/24/2015 3:00 PM
Image from 12 Years a Slave by Fox Searchlight PicturesSaturday, October 24 | 4:30-5:30 PMHarris Hall, Room 1071881 Sheridan Rd | Evanston, IL | 60208Members: $9Public: $12Students and Teachers: $512 Years a Slave was the most recent and acclaimed movie to depict plantation slavery, but this genre has a varied, complicated history. Northwestern University professors Miriam Petty and Nick Davis will unpack these traditions through close analysis of important works, from television landmarks like Roots to independent films like Sankofa and Daughters of the Dust. They will then invite the audience to debate different storytelling approaches to this painful but vital subject. Presenters:Miriam Petty is an assistant professor in the Department of Radio/Television/Film and African American Studies at Northwestern University, and the author of a forthcoming book Stealing the Show: African American Performers and Audiences in 1930s Hollywood. She writes and teaches about stardom, reception, genre, race, and media, and also produces public programs. Her recent projects include the 2012 symposium “Madea’s Big Scholarly Roundtable: Perspectives on the Media of Tyler Perry” at Northwestern University and the 2014 film retrospective “Mama and Papa Lala: 30 Years of Hatch-Billops Films” at Emory University.Nick Davis is Associate Professor of English and Gender & Sexuality Studies at Northwestern University, where he teaches in the areas of popular film, feminist and LGBT studies, and American literature. His book The Desiring-Image (Oxford University Press, 2013) outlines new aesthetic and philosophical approaches to contemporary queer cinema. He has published additional essays on Julie Dash’s Illusions, Alfonso Cuarón's Y tu mamá también, Ang Lee's Brokeback Mountain, and Pixar's film The Incredibles, among other films.
209 | Slavery on Screen
10/24/2015 4:30 PM
Photo by Tanya SazanskySaturday, October 24 | 4:30-5:30 PMNorris University Center, McCormick Auditorium1999 Campus Dr | Evanston, IL | 60208Members: $9Public: $12Students and Teachers: $5Russian-born Masha Gessen is one of our most eloquent reporters on global citizenry. Words Will Break Cement: The Passion of Pussy Riot, an account of the Russian punk band protesting the regime of Vladimir Putin, details the perils of activism in 21st-century Russia. Now she turns her unflinching eye to a story much closer to home. The Brothers is a groundbreaking book on Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the two men behind the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing. Building on research and interviews in Kyrgyzstan, Dagestan, Chechnya, and the United States, Gessen unfolds a disturbing story about two young men with their feet on American soil but their loyalties elsewhere.This program is generously underwritten by Angela Lustig and Dale Taylor.A book signing will follow this program.Presenters:Masha Gessen is a Russian-American journalist and author of bestselling books about the Tsarnaev brothers, Valdimir Putin, and Pussy Riot. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, The New York Times, The New York Review of Books, Slate, and many other publications. From 2012-2013 she served as the director of Radio Liberty’s Russia Service and in 2013 she was honored with the Media for Liberty Award. She currently lives in New York.
210 | Citizen Journalist: From Pussy Riot to the Boston Marathon
10/24/2015 4:30 PM
Photo by Jonathan LovekinSaturday, October 24 | 5-6 PMCahn Auditorium600 Emerson St | Evanston, IL | 60208Members: $15Public: $20Students and Teachers: $10Dinner parties got a whole lot better in the autumn of 2011. That’s when Yotam Ottolenghi’s Plenty, a cookbook with an enticingly squishy cover and vibrant, Mediterranean-infused innovations hit America. Ottolenghi, a London-based chef, restaurateur, and “The New Vegetarian” columnist for the Guardian seduced home cooks with surprising, delicious, and utterly beautiful creations that embrace global culinary culture. He went on to explore the varied gastronomic influences in his home city of Jerusalem, where Arabic and Jewish cuisines mix. Now, Ottolenghi returns with NOPI, a project with Ramael Scully that celebrates a fusion of Asian and Middle Eastern cuisine.Preorder your copy of NOPI for $32 through the CHF box office for pickup at the program.This program is generously underwritten by Sylvia and Lawrence Margolies, and Carol Rosofsky and Robert B. Lifton.A book signing will follow this program.Presenters:Israeli-born, British-based cookbook author and chef Yotam Ottolenghi is the founder and co-owner of Ottolenghi delis and NOPI restaurant. He writes a weekly column in the Guardian Weekend magazine and has published four bestselling cookbooks: Plenty; Plenty More (his collection of vegetarian recipes); Ottolenghi: The Cookbook and Jerusalem (both co-authored with Sami Tamimi). Ottolenghi has made two Mediterranean Feasts series for More 4, along with a BBC documentary, Jerusalem on a Plate. Ramael Scully was born in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and started his culinary career at the age of seventeen in Sydney, Australia. Now head chef at NOPI, Scully first worked under Yotam Ottolenghi in 2004 at Ottolenghi.
211 | Citizen Chef, Global Foodie: Yotam Ottolenghi
10/24/2015 5:00 PM
Saturday, October 24 | 6:30-7:30 PMBienen School of Music, Mary B. Galvin Recital Hall70 Arts Circle Dr | Evanston, IL | 60208Members: $20Public: $25Students and Teachers: $12Champian Fulton’s swinging style and charismatic performances have made her a guardian of the jazz legacy. Born and raised in the Heartland, the jazz pianist and vocalist, along with her quartet, have gone on to captivate audiences from New York to Barcelona. Inspired by Erroll Garner, Count Basie, and Sarah Vaughan, Fulton will perform classics ranging from Gershwin to Dinah Washington. Hum along to hits like “Get Out of Town,” “It’s All Right With Me,” “Blue Skies,” and “Our Love Is Here to Stay.”This program is generously underwritten by the Helen B. and Ira E. Graham Family.Presenters:Champian Fulton has become a world class jazz pianist and vocalist with international acclaim. She has performed with musical royalty such as Lou Donaldson, Frank Wess, Eric Alexander, Buster Williams, and Louis Hayes. Champian Sings and Swings was acknowledged as “one of the top ten Jazz releases of the year” by NY Observer. Champian strives to impart her knowledge to students around the world, while being involved in educational programs such as Litchfield Jazz Camp and Rutgers Jazz Institute.
212 | Champian-ing the American Songbook
10/24/2015 6:30 PM
Sunday, October 25 | 12-1 PMReva and David Logan Center for the Arts, Performance Hall915 E 60th St | Chicago, IL | 60637Members: $9Public: $12Students and Teachers: $5In the summer of 1995, Chicago experienced the deadliest heat wave in American history. Streets buckled, power grids failed, and when the heat finally broke, more than 700 people were dead. The questions of why so many people perished, and why their deaths were so easy to deny, ignore, or forget, preoccupied Eric Klinenberg. He uncovered unsettling forms of social breakdown – the isolation of seniors, the abandonment of poor neighborhoods, and the retrenchment of public assistance programs – which led him to write Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago. Drawing on his experience as research director for the federal Rebuild By Design competition after Superstorm Sandy, he also discovered that global warming makes these issues all the more dangerous and argues that cities must adapt, or face worse incidents in the future. A book signing will follow this program.Presenters:Eric Klinenberg is Professor of Sociology and Director of the Institute for Public Knowledge at NYU. He's the author of several books, including Going Solo and (with Aziz Ansari) Modern Romance, and he has contributed to the New Yorker, Rolling Stone, and This American Life. A new edition of his classic book, Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago, is out this year.
300 | Chicago's Heat Wave 20 Years Later
10/25/2015 12:00 PM
Photo by Paolo Crosetto CC BY-SASunday, October 25 | 1:30-2:30 PMReva and David Logan Center for the Arts, Theater East915 E 60th St | Chicago, IL | 60637Members: $9Public: $12Students and Teachers: $5Literary scholar Adrienne Brown finds a surprising vantage point on the history and dynamic of modern race relations through that uniquely American architectural form, the skyscraper. In stories by Henry James, W. E. B. Dubois, and others, Brown sees a fascination with these towering structures, particularly with the new – if disorienting – view audacious buildings offered on urban communities, and their potential for removing racial divides. The University of Chicago professor will lead a compelling discussion of architecture and race.This program is presented in partnership with the 2015 Chicago Architectural Biennial.Presenters:Adrienne Brown is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Chicago. She specializes in American and African-American cultural production in the 20th century. Her current project explores the influence of architecture and urban planning on literary form alongside the ways that narrative intervenes in historical and experiential understandings of space. Brown received her Ph.D. from Princeton University in 2011.
301 | Skyscrapers and Race
10/25/2015 1:30 PM
Photo courtesy of Ananya RoySunday, October 25 | 1:30-2:30 PMReva and David Logan Center for the Arts, Film Screening Room 201915 E 60th St | Chicago, IL | 60637Members: $9Public: $12Students and Teachers: $5The world seems to be turning into one vast city. How is this social transformation impacting political participation, problems of inequality, and the environment? Born in Calcutta and now teaching urban planning and global poverty at UCLA, Ananya Roy brings a keenly analytic mind and a passion for justice to these enormous questions. Whether it is the efficacy of microfinancing in the Global South or the goals of anti-eviction campaigns in our own backyard, Roy leads the conversation looking for solutions.This program is presented in partnership with the Chicago Council on Global Affairs.Presenters:Ananya Roy is Professor of Urban Planning and Social Welfare and inaugural Director of the Institute on Inequality and Democracy at the University of California, Los Angeles. Ananya’s scholarship has focused on urban transformations in the global South, including the making of “world-class” cities, their enclaves of wealth and power, and their systematic exclusion of the poor. Interested in how academic research can inform public debate, Ananya has experimented with digital and social media to produce a series of short videos that provoke questions about poverty and inequality.
302 | The Urban Globe
10/25/2015 1:30 PM
Sunday, October 25 | 1:30-2:30 PMReva and David Logan Center for the Arts, Performance Penthouse 901915 E 60th St | Chicago, IL | 60637Members: $9Public: $12Students and Teachers: $5The Heartland has always been at the center of Laird Hunt’s writing. In his latest work, the critically acclaimed Neverhome, an Indiana housewife and farmer disguises herself as a man and enlists in the Union Army. Inspired by powerful real-life incidents, Hunt weaves a gorgeous, fictional universe and enthralling narrative. His rich, warm cadences mesmerize on and off the page, and with this midwestern view of the Civil War, he will take his rightful place among our era’s most gifted novelists. Chicago writer Kevin Kilroy will join him for a conversation.A book signing will follow this program.Presenters:Laird Hunt is the author of six novels including, most recently, Neverhome. His writings, reviews and translations have appeared in the United States and abroad in, among other places, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Daily Beast, McSweeney’s, Ploughshares, Bomb, Bookforum, Grand Street, The Believer, Fence, Conjunctions, Brick, Mentor, Inculte, and Zoum Zoum. He teaches at the University of Denver Creative, where he edits the Denver Quarterly.Kevin Kilroy is a writer and a teacher living in Chicago’s Edgewater neighborhood. His fiction has been published by Akashic, Fact-Simile, Hot Whiskey, Poets & Artists, Summer Stock, Pinstripe Fedora, Sherlock Holmes & Philosophy and others. Kevin co-founded Black Lodge Press, served as the Drama editor with Requited Journal and on the Fiction Board with Another Chicago Magazine (ACM). Currently he serves as small press curator for Printers’ Ball and co-editor of Pinball Editions. His play The Silence of Malachi Ritscher was produced in 2007 by Theatre 5.2.1.
303 | Neverhome: A Reading with Laird Hunt
10/25/2015 1:30 PM
Sunday, October 25 | 2-3 PMReva and David Logan Center for the Arts, Performance Hall915 E 60th St | Chicago, IL | 60637Members: $9Public: $12Students and Teachers: $5“A born-again Christian, a pious Muslim, and an orthodox Jew go behind closed doors for 13 days and emerge with the only durable peace treaty in the Middle East.” This is the premise of Pulitzer Prize– winning journalist Lawrence Wright’s latest book, Thirteen Days in September, which details the Camp David negotiations among Jimmy Carter, Anwar Sadat, and Menachem Begin. Wright’s work, from his history of al-Qaeda to his exposé of Scientology (Going Clear), explores our deepest convictions, and how we do – or don’t – manage to live with those who hold different beliefs. Hear about an unprecedented historical event from one of America’s finest nonfiction writers.This program is generously underwritten by Paula R. Kahn.A book signing will follow this program.Presenters:Lawrence Wright is a staff writer for The New Yorker and the author of six previous books of nonfiction, including In the New World, Remembering Satan, The Looming Tower, Going Clear, and one novel, God’s Favorite. His books have received many prizes and honors, including a Pulitzer Prize for The Looming Tower. He is also a playwright and screenwriter. He and his wife are longtime residents of Austin, Texas.
304 | Lawrence Wright: Peace Against All Odds
10/25/2015 2:00 PM
Sunday, October 25 | 3:30-4:30 PMReva and David Center for the Arts, Theater East915 E 60th St | Chicago, IL | 60637Members: $9Public: $12Students and Teachers: $5In examining history, Jakobi Williams concludes that it is no coincidence that the first African American president hails from Chicago. In his recent book, From the Bullet to the Ballot: The Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party and Racial Coalition Politics in Chicago, this native South Sider uses sealed secret police files and first-person interviews to explore the history and impact of the Black Panther Party and Rainbow Coalition. Learn about this important chapter in the long battle to forge a more just city and nation.This program is presented in partnership with the College Arts and Humanities Institute at Indiana University.Presenters:Jakobi Williams is an Associate Professor in the Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies and the Department of History at Indiana University. He has held academic positions at the University of California Los Angeles, the University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign, and the University of Kentucky. His most recent book, From the Bullet to the Ballot: The Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party and Racial Coalition Politics in Chicago was published by the University of North Carolina Press under its John Hope Franklin Series.
305 | From the Bullet to the Ballot: Black Panthers and Chicago's Racial Coalitions
10/25/2015 3:30 PM